Top News

Confidential deal between suburban hotel partners is void, because it sought to conceal alleged bank fraud

Dan Churney Aug. 7, 2017, 5:50pm

Confidential deal between suburban hotel partners is void, because it sought to conceal alleged bank fraud

Appeals court: Pension fund has right to $11M, potential tax hike from Harvey for underpaying pensions

Jonathan Bilyk Aug. 7, 2017, 5:19pm

While leaving it to the elected leaders of the city of Harvey to figure how much tax to levy to get the money they need from property tax payers, a state appeals court panel has ruled the south suburban city’s pension fund is on the brink of default, and, thus, the pension board for the city’s firefighters has a valid claim under state law to force the city to cough up nearly $11 million in unpaid and underpaid pension fund contributions.

$22M deal proposed to end injured lawyer's litigation vs bankrupt Yellow Cab over '05 taxi crash

Jonathan Bilyk Aug. 3, 2017, 1:40pm

A Chicago federal bankruptcy judge has been asked to sign off on a $22 million settlement, intended to lay to rest claims against a now bankrupt taxi company, brought by a Chicago lawyer who was left with brain damage and other injuries after the taxi in which he was riding crashed into a concrete median in 2005.

Appeals court orders more proceedings on question of who should own Piemonte car dealerships

Scott Holland Aug. 2, 2017, 3:26pm

A state appeals panel said more courtroom time is needed to determine how to divide ownership of a Chicago area car dealership following the death of its well-known, namesake owner.

Jury OK to order Geracis to pay dogwalker $275K for elevator confrontation, battery: Appeals court

Scott Holland Jul. 21, 2017, 6:00am

A state appeals court has upheld a jury’s verdict against the wife of bankruptcy lawyer Peter Francis Geraci, saying she needs to pay $275,000 to a dog walker she accused of attacking her almost four years ago.

First District appeals court reinstates woman's wrongful demolition case against Chicago City Hall

Chandra Lye Jul. 13, 2017, 7:00am

A woman has been given another chance to press her claim that the city of Chicago unlawfully demolished a property she co-owned, after a state appeals court reversed a decision by a Cook County judge to dismiss her case.

Cook County soda tax to remain blocked, for at least a few more days, appeals panel says

Jonathan Bilyk Jul. 10, 2017, 4:27pm

A state appeals court has rejected Cook County’s attempt to lift a stay on the county’s new so-called soda tax, directing a Cook County judge to proceed with plans to hear arguments on whether enforcement of the tax should be more permanently blocked.

Appeals panel: Neck, back clinic 'incidental recipient,' no right to interest on worker comp claims

Scott Holland Jul. 7, 2017, 6:29pm

A state appeals panel has sided with several insurance companies facing class action complaints from a Chicago-based medical practice specializing in treating neck and back injuries as part of worker compensation claims, saying the clinic has no right under the law to demand insurers pay interest on slow-arriving reimbursements.

Appeals court: No 'abstract right' to city retiree health insurance if no such contract guarantee

Scott Holland Jul. 7, 2017, 6:00am

Expressing doubt its opinion will end legal hostilities, a state appeals court weighed in yet again on a lawsuit Chicago retirees have lodged against the city in hopes of preserving their “abstract right” to subsidized health insurance under the Illinois state constitution.

NorthShore asks court to slice class action demanding IL hospitals repay for improper tax exemptions

Dan Churney Jul. 4, 2017, 6:00am

Saying the basis for the suit has been amputated by Illinois’ highest court, NorthShore University Health System is asking a Cook County judge to dismiss a class-action suit, which demanded hospitals be made to pay back Illinois property taxpayers who have allegedly overpaid because, the plaintiffs allege, the state’s hospitals have wrongly enjoyed tax-exempt status.

Appeals panel: Oak Lawn can't nix injured firefighter's disability pension, though he took job in Texas

Scott Holland Jul. 3, 2017, 12:00pm

A state appeals court has sided with a Cook County judge who said a pension board was wrong to revoke disability pension payments to an Oak Lawn firefighter who had taken a job at a Texas fire department despite doctors’ assertions he had been permanently disabled in an accident more than a decade ago.

'Subjective intent' not enough to steer $108K to one biz, not another favored by deceased contractor

Glenn Minnis Jun. 21, 2017, 3:46pm

A state appeals panel has affirmed a Cook County judge's summary judgment against the plaintiffs in a dispute over which of two companies - whose leadership included the same person and whose names were separated by one letter - was entitled to consulting fees stemming from work performed by a contractor with ties to both entities.

Appeals panel: ILRB exec. dir. lacks authority to yank bargaining unit certification without due process

Melissa Busch Jun. 20, 2017, 10:40am

A state appellate court has vacated an Illinois labor board's decision to dismiss a petition by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) to represent several workers in the Cook County Sheriff's electronic monitoring unit, saying the labor board erred in allowing its executive director to yank certification without due process.

Appeals panel: Lawyer not allowed to keep $600K fee for qui tam unpaid sales tax suit vs My Pillow

Scott Holland Jun. 16, 2017, 6:09pm

A state appeals court has ruled a lawyer who had individually sued pillow maker My Pillow, ostensibly on behalf of the state of Illinois for unpaid taxes, is not allowed to keep roughly $600,000 in legal fees he had claimed as part of the litigation.

IL Supreme Court: IL constitution doesn't expand protesters' assembly rights beyond First Amendment

Jonathan Bilyk Jun. 16, 2017, 2:41pm

A Chicago ordinance prohibiting anyone, even protesters, from remaining overnight in Grant Park without a special city permit is constitutional, the Illinois Supreme Court has ruled, rejecting contentions from lawyers for left-wing protest groups that the state constitution grants broader rights to assembly than does the U.S. Constitution.

Cook Co. judge wrong to refuse transfer of asbestos case with no links to Cook

Scott Holland Jun. 15, 2017, 3:11pm

A state appeals panel has overruled a Cook County judge who had refused to transfer to Winnebago County an asbestos exposure case involving a plaintiff who had worked at industrial facilities in Winnebago, and couldn't say for sure he had even been exposed to asbestos in Cook County at all.

Appeals panel: Social service agencies can't be paid without state appropriations

Jonathan Bilyk Jun. 15, 2017, 2:37pm

Noting the contracts they signed made their payments contingent on the availability of legally appropriated state funds, an Illinois appellate court has found a coalition of social service providers have no legal or constitutional leg to stand on to demand the state pay them without first securing the proper appropriations from the state’s legislature and governor.

Appeals panel: Judge correct to find IL wrong to deny CPOP as OK condition for medical marijuana

Glenn Minnis Jun. 6, 2017, 4:59pm

A state appeals panel has agreed a Cook County judge was right to find state regulators were wrong in denying a request to add a condition known as chronic post-operative pain to the growing list of conditions for which medical marijuana can legally be prescribed in Illinois. But they struck down the judge's order to the state to add CPOP as an approved condition "within 30 days."

Appeals court denies constitutional challenge to Illinois repose statute in estate legal malpractice case

Mike Helenthal Jun. 5, 2017, 5:40pm

The Illinois First District Appellate Court has upheld a lower court's decision that a plaintiff couldn’t sue the lawyers who handled his father’s estate because he didn’t file the malpractice suit in time, ruling Illinois' repose statute was constitutionally sound in placing "reasonable" time limits on the ability of heirs to sue over the handling of estates.

Challenge to Chicago landmarks ordinance cleared again to proceed; appeals court orders new judge

Scott Holland Jun. 1, 2017, 11:49pm

Two Chicago property owners have – again – won the chance to press ahead with their legal challenge to the city of Chicago’s designation of their neighborhoods as historical landmarks, after a state appeals panel – again – slapped down a Cook County judge’s decision to dismiss their lawsuit, and ordered a different judge to take a crack at the case.