Loevy & Loevy News

Lawyers: Defendants trying to undermine $56M-75M cruise line telemarketing calls settlement

By Dan Churney | May 21, 2018

Attorneys who bagged millions of dollars in fees from a $56-$75 million class action settlement in Chicago federal court against a cruise line and others accused of making illegal telemarketing calls, are alleging the defendants are trying now to sabotage the settlement by using bogus grounds to challenge 45,000 of 58,000 claims submitted.

Chicago mayor's office accused of violating FOIA for allegedly refusing to reveal city's bid for Amazon HQ2

By Louie Torres | Feb 19, 2018

A civic transparency activist group is suing the Chicago Mayor's Office for refusing to turn over information related to the city's bid to land Amazon's planned second headquarters.

Sun-Times sues CTA, Chicago Police over failure to turn over video of man being pushed onto L tracks

By Louie Torres | Feb 15, 2018

The Chicago Sun-Times is suing the Chicago Transit Authority and Chicago Police Department for allegedly failing to produce video surveillance footage showing a passenger being pushed from a platform at a Blue Line CTA station by another man.

Governor's Office accused of failing to comply with Freedom of Information Act request

By Louie Torres | Nov 17, 2017

A man is suing the office of Ill. Gov. Bruce Rauner for alleged violations of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Lawyer sues Schaumburg cops, says must include names, addresses on crash reports used to solicit clients

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 20, 2017

About a month after settling a potential class action lawsuit accusing him of breaking a federal law when he used the village’s police vehicle crash reports to solicit potential clients for personal injury lawsuits, a lawyer now has sued the village of Schaumburg, saying police departments can’t withhold from him the contact information of those involved in vehicle crashes.

Judge: Lawyers' objections to rival attorneys' $24M fee request merely cash grab, not worth $59K fees

By Jonathan Bilyk | Aug 28, 2017

While a Texas lawyer and his client say their efforts helped reduce other attorneys’ multi-million dollar payday under a $56 million class action settlement deal, a federal judge has rejected their attempts to grab a $59,000 share of that settlement, saying their efforts were redundant and produced nothing but an opportunity for them to grab some quick cash.

Appeals court: Rosemont can't keep lid on its take from rents, concession sales at its arenas

By Dee Thompson | Jul 21, 2017

The village of Rosemont can't cite concerns over "competitive harm" to others when picking and choosing which financial documents to publicly disclose - and specifically when trying to keep privileged its take from rents and concession revenues from the arenas it owns and operates, a state appeals court has affirmed.

Newspaper, writers sue Chicago PD, city over lack of response to 'heat list' FOIA request

By Louie Torres | Jun 29, 2017

The Chicago Sun-Times and independent journalists Brandon Smith, George Joseph and Jamie Kalvenand are suing the Chicago Police Department and the city of Chicago, alleging violation of state and federal law.

IL Supreme Court: IHSA may oversee public high school sports, but not a public body subject to FOIA

By Scott Holland | May 19, 2017

In an unanimous opinion, the Illinois Supreme Court agreed the Illinois High School Association – the organization which partners with high schools to oversee high school athletics across the state – does not need to share its documents with the public under the Freedom of Information Act.

'Serial objector' lawyer Bandas says owed cut of $56M TCPA deal because helped trim other lawyers' fees

By Jonathan Bilyk | Apr 21, 2017

A Texas lawyer embroiled in a racketeering action accusing him and others of being “serial objectors” out to simply claim a chunk of others’ negotiated class action settlements has inserted himself into another massive class action deal, asking a federal judge to award him money for representing an organization whose objection to the attorney fee request in a $56 million deal to end a class action against a cruise line, phone poll operator and timeshare company, helped reduce other attorneys’ multi-million dollar payday.

Judge OKs at least $15M for plaintiff lawyers under Caribbean cruise telemarketing class action deal

By Jonathan Bilyk | Apr 7, 2017

A Chicago federal judge has signed off on an award of more than $15 million – and potentially, as much as $18.9 million – in attorney fees for lawyers who secured a $76 million settlement from a cruise line and other associated companies accused of using nonprofit surveys to mask illegal telemarketing calls.

Defendants say attorney fees are ‘excessive’ in potential $76M deal in cruise line robocall class action

By Dan Churney | Mar 6, 2017

A Chicago federal judge has green-lighted a potential $76 million settlement in a million-member class action suit, which alleged a cruise line and other companies masked telemarketing calls as nonprofit surveys. The judge, however, held off for now approving what could be as much as $24.5 million in fees for plaintiffs’ attorneys – fees defendants are alleging are “excessive” and “unreasonable.” 

Man convicted of murder says City Hall has denied him access to records

By Louie Torres | Feb 10, 2017

A man who was sentenced to 200 years in prison in connection with a September 1977 homicide case is suing the Chicago Police Department and the City of Chicago, alleging violation of federal law.

Ticket broker says Chicago Cubs wrongly canceled his 30 season tickets, owe him seats for 2017

By Scott Holland | Feb 7, 2017

A Pennsylvania ticket broker is suing the Cubs, saying the team refused to renew his season tickets. 

Judge: New jail policy allowed sheriff to avoid order to distribute prisoner rights journal to inmates

By Scott Holland | Nov 30, 2016

A federal judge has sided with the Cook County Sheriff’s Office and its policy of keeping inmates at the county jail from reading magazines focused on the legal rights of prisoners.

Chicago lawyer says neighbors using alderman to block his home project, demands alderman's emails

By Jonathan Bilyk | Nov 29, 2016

A Chicago lawyer has taken to court his dispute with his neighbors and a Chicago alderman over his Wicker Park home construction project, asking a Cook County judge to order the city of Chicago and Alderman Joe Moreno to turn over all emails, text messages and other communications which may show whether friends of Moreno – the lawyer’s neighbors – had used the alderman to block him from installing a heated sidewalk at his house.

Cruise line, others agree to pay up to $76M to end lawsuit over telemarketing cloaked as surveys

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 4, 2016

A cruise line and other companies accused of allegedly cloaking telemarketing calls as nonprofit surveys have agreed to settle a federal class action lawsuit against them, agreeing to pay potentially as much as $76 million – including potentially as much as $24 million to plaintiffs’attorneys - to end the litigation before it went to trial.

Illinois High School Association records ruling being appealed to state's high court

By Robert Lawson | Sep 6, 2016

The Illinois High School Association (IHSA) has been ruled by an Illinois Appellate Court to not be subject to public records requests under FOIA. But lawyers for a journalistic group suing the IHSA for access believes the courts may have erred in determining too narrowly what constitutes a public organization.

Judge sinks bid by cruise line to use Spokeo to thwart class action over telemarketing disguised as surveys

By Dana Herra | Aug 26, 2016

A cruise line and other companies being sued for allegedly cloaking telemarketing calls under the guise of nonprofit surveys lost an attempt to use the recent U.S. Supreme Court Spokeo ruling to defeat a class action against them.

Federal judge tosses privacy claim against LifeWatch fraud whistleblower

By Jonathan Bilyk | May 10, 2016

Noting that whistleblower laws exist specifically to protect whistleblowers from legal actions in retaliation for blowing the whistle on wrongdoing, a federal judge has tossed a lawsuit brought by heart monitoring company, Lifewatch, against one of its former employees, who the company attempted to argue broke federal privacy laws when he handed over documents containing patient information to the federal government to support his accusations that LifeWatch had defrauded Medicare.

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