U.S. Supreme Court News

Supreme Court decision could help reduce 'forum shopping' in False Claims Act fraud suits

By John Sammon | Dec 12, 2018

The U.S. Supreme Court could be poised to deal a blow to so-called "forum shopping" and a stronger hand to companies and others defending themselves against would-be whistleblowers accusing them of defrauding the government.

Appeals panel: Despite Janus decision, still no class actions vs unions over illegally collected fees

By Jonathan Bilyk | Dec 7, 2018

A federal appeals panel in Chicago has again rejected an attempt by a group of home caregivers to bring a class action lawsuit against the labor union they say used an Illinois state law to unconstitutionally grab $32 million in fees from their pay, as the judges said the decision holds up even when reevaluated in light of a recent Supreme Court decision further restricting unions’ abilities to force non-union public workers to pay such fees.

After SCOTUS decision, others watching California's public nuisance lead paint action copied elsewhere

By Gabriel Neves | Nov 6, 2018

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision to deny paint manufacturers' appeal of a California ruling requiring them to pay more than $400 million for lead paint remediation, companies could face significantly greater odds of litigation under the theory of "public nuisance."

SCOTUS lets stand Penn high court's takeover of redistricting; Illinois reformers have taken note

By Cook County Record | Nov 5, 2018

After a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court rejecting Pennsylvania Republicans' attempt to redraw that state's congressional districts, an organization dedicated toward reforming how Illinois draws its legislative districts, which are currently skewed to favor Democrats, says the decision could help spur reform in other states, including Illinois, both legislatively and in the courts.

Attorney: Court's denial of Lincolnshire right-to-work ordinance could forebode SCOTUS fight

By Gabriel Neves | Oct 9, 2018

A recent decision by a federal appeals court in Chicago likely forebodes a legal fight before the U.S. Supreme Court over the fate of so-called local right-to-work zones in Illinois and throughout the country.

Appeals judges: Lincolnshire, other towns can't create right-to-work zones, despite home rule powers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 1, 2018

Saying to find otherwise would create “catastrophic” consequences for labor law in Illinois and across the country, a federal appeals panel has backed a federal judge’s decision to toss an attempt by a northwest suburban village to use its home rule powers to create a local right-to-work zone within its borders.

Federal appeals court won’t review its decision to toss $3M verdict v. GSK; Plaintiff: ‘Dangerous precedent’

By Dan Churney | Sep 24, 2018

A Chicago federal appellate court has refused to reexamine its decision last month that reversed a $3 million verdict against drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline, on grounds the company was not responsible for the labeling of the generic version of its product Paxil, despite plaintiff’s urging a rehearing was needed, because she said the appeals panel set a “dangerous precedent.”

California boardroom gender quota bill is something for businesses in IL, elsewhere, "to watch," attorney says

By Gabriel Neves | Sep 19, 2018

A bill passed in California setting gender quotas on the boards of public companies could generate significant legal challenges, which likely would need to be resolved before other states move to copy it, an attorney following the legislation believes.

Anti-union IL state worker asks judge to let him defend state vs union attempt to 'discriminate' vs non-union workers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 13, 2018

Saying Illinois’ attorney general’s defense is “inadequate” and is “bordering on malpractice,” an Illinois state employee who factored in the court action that led to the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to strike down rules requiring non-union workers to pay fees to unions has again jumped into a federal court action, this time asking a judge to allow his legal team to defend the state against a union’s attempt to secure a court order striking down labor laws requiring them to represent all workers in a collective bargaining unit.

Attorney calls Supreme Court's Jevic structured dismissal reversal noteworthy

By Kyla Asbury | Aug 10, 2018

CHICAGO — The U.S. Supreme Court reversed a Third Circuit Court of Appeals "structured dismissal" ruling in a case in which former Jevic Holding Corp. truck drivers fought against being left out of a settlement in the company's Chapter 11 bankruptcy case, according to an article written by David Christian for The Circuit Rider.

Lincolnshire: Taxes different from union dues; asks judge to toss union suit over 'anti-union' lobbying funds

By Jonathan Bilyk | Aug 3, 2018

Saying governments are different from labor unions and other private organizations, a north suburban village and an organization that lobbies on behalf of Illinois city and village governments has asked a federal judge to dismiss a union-backed lawsuit asserting the rights of union members are violated by local governments which use tax money to fund lobbyists to seek reforms opposed by unions.

SCOTUS takes Merck's Fosamax appeal, could boost GSK's appeal of $3M verdict over lawyer's suicide

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 3, 2018

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to wade into the contentious question over whether a pharmaceutical company can be held liable for failing to warn consumers and doctors of a drug’s potential effects, potentially portending significant implications for a $3 million verdict a jury awarded to the widow of a Chicago lawyer who committed suicide in the Loop after taking the generic version of an antidepressant drug.

Post-Janus Landscape: Decision will impact union coffers, membership; more litigation on its way, say lawyers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 2, 2018

In the wake of the U.S Supreme Court’s landmark decision to declare unconstitutional forced union fees, the legal and political landscape will undoubtedly change. But precisely what will change, and how and when those changes will roll out, remains anybody’s guess.

Janus decision could give IL caregivers new shot at reclaiming $32M in unconstitutional union fees: SCOTUS

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 28, 2018

A day after overturning the legal precedent that allowed public sector unions to use the state to grab a share of non-union workers’ paychecks, the U.S. Supreme Court has ordered a federal appeals court in Chicago to use its ruling to take another look at his decision forbidding a group of home caregivers from suing a labor union to claw back some of the $32 million in similar fees the state had taken from the caregivers and paid to the union.

US Supreme Court: Forced collection of 'fair share' union fees unconstitutional, violates workers' free speech rights

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 27, 2018

Compelling non-union government workers to pay so-called “fair share fees” to unions they do not wish to join violates the First Amendment speech rights of non-union workers and is unconstitutional, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled, finding in favor of an Illinois state worker who had sued to end the fees, also known as agency fees, in Illinois and across the country.

Clerk: Cook County's methods of maintaining voter rolls better than SCOTUS-approved Ohio purge

By Tomas Kassahun | Jun 26, 2018

With a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an Ohio state law allowing state election officials may remove people from the roll of eligible voters if voters skip a few elections and fail to respond to a mailed notice from state election officials, asking them to verify they still live in the place in which they claim to be registered to vote.

Attorneys: US Supreme Court's Masterpiece Cakeshop decision important win for exercise of 'sincere' religious beliefs

By John Sammon | Jun 12, 2018

The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision, granting a win to a Colorado baker accused of violating the civil rights of a gay couple by refusing to bake a custom-designed cake for their wedding, could signal that, while the courts are upholding the civil rights of same-sex couples, it does not create a legal "open season" on others - including business owners - whose religious beliefs may not allow them to walk in step with society's rapidly changing values, say two attorneys who specialize in litigating religious freedom cases.

Nickel & Dime: eBay, online retailers warn SCOTUS could unleash lawsuit torrent vs sellers over taxes

By Dan Churney | Jun 7, 2018

Nickel & Dime: eBay, online retailers warn SCOTUS ruling could unleash torrent of lawsuits accusing sellers over taxes

No quit in trial bar after SCOTUS ruling, still filing lawsuits in favorite courts

By John O'Brien | Jun 4, 2018

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) – Since last year’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling that dealt a blow to forum-shopping personal injury attorneys, companies threatened with sprawling, 50-state litigation have not been forced into defending cases all over the country.

SCOTUS employee arbitration decision could have profound effects on employment law, costly class actions

By Ryan Croft | May 31, 2018

One of the most recent decisions from the U.S. Supreme Court could have the greatest impact on employment and class action law of any case in years.

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