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U.S. Supreme Court News

Lawyer says SCOTUS decision encourages whistleblowers to report to SEC, not to employers internally

A recent Supreme Court ruling may lead to more whistleblowers reporting alleged infractions within their companies to the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (SEC), rather than beginning the process first in-house, according to one legal expert

Wheaton College wins order vs Obamacare contraceptive mandate; Judge: Violates religious freedom

In the wake of a decision by the administration of President Donald Trump to reinterpret federal health regulations requiring religious employers to pay for contraceptive health insurance coverage, a federal judge has granted Wheaton College a permanent injunction barring the federal government from forcing the prominent evangelical Christian college in Chicago’s western suburbs from having to pay for its employees’ contraception, which the college had argued would violate its religious rights.

Union lawsuit: If union can't force non-union workers to pay, also can't be forced to represent them

In advance of what they expect to be a stinging defeat for labor unions at the U.S. Supreme Court, a prominent Illinois union has countered with a suit of its own, claiming, if the court finds unions can be barred from forcing non-union workers to pay fees to the union for collective bargaining, so, too, the unions can’t be forced to include those workers in the deals they cut with government officials.

Union member sues Lincolnshire, says village can't support group that lobbied for Rauner reform agenda

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepared to hear arguments on the question of whether state rules requiring non-union workers pay fees to unions violate the Constitution, a union member in suburban Lincolnshire has sued his village government, demanding the court declare the rights of union members have been similarly violated by local governments which use taxpayer money to fund lobbyists to seek reforms opposed by unions.

Calif. AG fears possible effects of union fees case at U.S. Supreme Court

Legal Newsline

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) – An amicus brief filed by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra argues public employees should have to pay union fees even if they fell that it contributes to political pandering.

State AGs speak up in Janus case to preserve collection of union fees from non-union workers

Legal Newsline

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) – Several friend-of-the-court briefs have now been filed with the U.S. Supreme Court in the lawsuit brought by Mark Janus, an Illinois state government employee who feels union dues should not be taken from his paycheck since he is not a member of a union.

Judge cites SCOTUS' Bristol-Myers decision to gut class action over Body Fortress dietary supplement

A Chicago federal judge has relied on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Bristol Myers Squibb decision to gut a suit against the makers of a dietary supplement, who allegedly made bogus claims about its effectiveness, saying non-Illinois claimants can't participate in a suit in Illinois.

GOP state lawmakers join Supreme Court brief asking to reject challenge to compulsory union fees

A group of nine Republicans currently serving in the Illinois General Assembly, including two rookie state lawmakers, have signed their names to a brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court, asking the court to uphold the state’s ability to allow unions to extract fees from government employees who don’t wish to join a union, arguing the country’s founding federalist principles should allow the 50 states to decide such policy questions for themselves.

Judge OKs $29M deal to end class action vs Ascension Health over Wheaton Franciscan pension claims

In the wake of last year’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling that religiously-affiliated hospitals can qualify for exemption from certain federal pension rules, a Chicago federal judge has signed off on a $29 million settlement, designed to end class action litigations against Ascension Health, in which the country’s largest Catholic hospital system was accused of attempting to use the religious exemption improperly to underfund its employees’ retirement plans.

Six Flags case could clarify requirements for biometric claims used in class actions

Legal Newsline

CHICAGO (Legal Newsline) – A closely watched Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) case could have bearing on Illinois' one-of-a-kind biometric privacy law after an appeals court ruled last month the plaintiff alleged no actual harm, an attorney who defends businesses against such cases said during a recent interview.

Petition: SCOTUS should undo rulings letting union keep $32M collected from caregivers unconstitutionally

Saying a union’s unconstitutional seizure of $32 million in fees from non-union home care providers via the state of Illinois was legally not much different than picking a pocket on the street, a group of those personal assistants have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to step in and overturn lower courts’ decisions allowing the union to keep the money, even the high court had determined the union had no right to collect the money in the first place.

Supreme Court refuses to hear home care providers' lawsuit vs SEIU over compelled representation

The U.S. Supreme Court has denied a group of Illinois child care providers and in-home care assistants for those with disabilities the chance to argue their constitutional rights were violated by an Illinois state law forcing the care providers to accept the Service Employees International Union as their bargaining representative.

Judge: Iowa couple's suit vs Apple Vacations over Mexico airport shuttle crash doesn't belong in IL court

A Chicago federal judge has tossed an Iowa couple’s lawsuit against Apple Vacations and related travel agencies over injuries they suffered in a car crash while on vacation in Mexico, saying the case has no business being in a courtroom in Chicago.

'The way due process is supposed to work': IL Sup Ct decision reshapes Cook County's legal landscape

Three years after the U.S. Supreme Court moved to significantly limit general personal jurisdiction over corporations, the Illinois Supreme Court at last has used that precedent to perhaps achieve legal venue reforms long sought by business groups and reform proponents - and long ignored by state lawmakers.

SCOTUS expected to toss rules forcing non-union workers to pay fees; big political impacts possible

Sweeping changes in how unions collect dues and fees can be expected soon, now that the U.S. Supreme Court has decided to hear a case against Illinois' largest public sector employee union, two labor attorneys said during a recent interview. And such a decision also could have significant ramifications for the nation's politics.

Employers win new flexibility, after appeals court finds ADA 'not a medical-leave entitlement'

Employers now may consider multiple-month medical leave requests under the Family and Medical Leave Act without analyzing Americans with Disabilities Act requirements after a federal court upheld a company's ADA win, a labor and employment attorney said.

SCOTUS to take up Illinois case challenging power of unions to collect fees from non-union state workers

The U.S. Supreme Court will again wade into the question of whether public sector worker unions can force government employees who don’t wish to join their union to still pay fees, ostensibly for collective bargaining representation, after the court on Sept. 28 agreed to hear arguments in the case of Janus v AFSCME.

SCOTUS rules patent owners exhaust rights with sale, leaving questions for manufacturers, innovators

The U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed a lower court’s decision finding consumers and even small businesses have the right to resell products without it being considered an infringement on the rights of the original manufacturer. And the 7-1 decision could leave manufacturers and others to explore precisely what this decision may mean for their businesses and their products.

Home caregivers ask SCOTUS: Can IL force union representation?; Potential ramifications far-reaching

A group of Illinois child care providers and in-home care providers for those with disabilities have asked the nation’s highest court to step in to their dispute with a prominent labor union, arguing the state’s decision to force the care providers to allow the Service Employees International Union to serve as their bargaining representative as a condition of accepting payment through state assistance programs violates their constitutional rights.

US Supreme Court ruling on Wisconsin land parcel regulation could have Illinois impact

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding a Wisconsin state law allowing the state to combine adjacent parcels owned by the same party for regulatory purposes could mean major changes for property owners in Illinois, as well.