Seyfarth Shaw, LLP News

With Democratic lock on IL government, 'new wave' of regulation, enforcement, litigation 'likely': Attorneys

By Jonathan Bilyk | Nov 8, 2018

Democrats have grabbed a stranglehold on Illinois state government. And that could mean businesses and employers of all sizes should begin to prepare for a new pro-labor, pro-plaintiffs environment of anticipated heightened government scrutiny, regulatory action and lawsuits, say attorneys who regularly work with businesses and employers facing such actions.

Appeals panel voids $27M for ex-Allstate portfolio analysts who said were maligned in Allstate SEC filings

By Scott Holland | Oct 31, 2018

A Chicago federal appeals panel has vacated a $27 million award previously given to former Allstate portfolio security analysts who accused the company of ruining their careers by allegedly incorrectly reporting to federal regulators the analysts had padded their bonus pay while pension funds were shorted.

Third strike: Judge tosses racketeering suit vs Seyfarth Shaw, Northern Trust over tax shelters

By DM Herra | Sep 25, 2018

Prominent Chicago law firm Seyfarth Shaw, financial services company Northern Trust, and others have sidestepped a racketeering claim brought by a financial services provider who claimed he was misled into investing in an illegal tax shelter that eventually cost him more than $10 million in back taxes, fees, interest and penalties.

Amended Illinois law requires employers to grant new moms paid nursing breaks

By Gabriel Neves | Sep 21, 2018

Nursing mothers in Illinois will now be granted "reasonable" paid breaks in the workplace to nurse a baby or express milk for up to a year following the birth of a child, under a new law.

Judges nix consumer antitrust vs steelmakers; Production chain too complex to undergird sprawling class action

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 7, 2018

While noting the plaintiffs had presented statements which could indicate price-fixing activity, a federal appeals panel has refused to melt down a lower court’s decision to slice up a potentially massive class action lawsuit accusing U.S. steelmakers of conspiring to jack up prices for raw steel.

Appeals panel divides over number of 'sole' causes, denies paralyzed jockey's try for new trial vs Arlington

By DM Herra | Jul 5, 2018

A divided state appellate court sided with the jury in a lawsuit against Arlington Park Racecourse by a jockey paralyzed in an accident, reversing a Cook County judge’s decision to grant a new trial because the jury had been improperly instructed to consider whether two different things could be considered the “sole” cause of an injury, simultaneously.

Judge: Jimmy John's can't be considered 'joint employer' of asst managers working at franchise shops

By Scott Holland | Jun 28, 2018

A federal judge in Chicago has ordered up a win for Jimmy John’s, saying the sandwich shop chain cannot be considered the joint employer of a group of assistant managers suing in search of overtime pay.

SEYFARTH SHAW LLP: Seyfarth Launches Blockchain Technologies Team

By Press release submission | Jun 22, 2018

Seyfarth Shaw LLP announced the formal launch of its Blockchain Technologies team, an interdisciplinary group of lawyers who counsel clients and interface with regulators to address legal issues raised by blockchain technology.

Court denies Ameriprise motion to dismiss or transfer Allstate client-poaching case

By Elizabeth Alt | Jun 22, 2018

Allstate can continue its lawsuit against Ameriprise Financial Services for violating federal trade secrets protection law by allegedly recruiting Allstate's current and former financial specialists to use their knowledge to steal Allstate's customers.

Visa, Aldi squabble over demand for documents showing Aldi's decision to take credit cards didn't hurt

By Dan Churney | Jun 22, 2018

Mired in a long-running anti-trust class action brought by millions of merchants who seek billions of dollars in connection with credit card processing fees, Visa wants the Aldi food store chain, which several months ago adopted a policy accepting cards from customers, to turn over documents that will presumably show Aldi freely chose to honor Visa cards, despite allegations Visa tried to throttle competition.

Wheelchair user presses claims vs Cubs over ADA seating; Cubs: Wait til Wrigley renovations wrap up

By Scott Holland | May 24, 2018

A wheelchair user is trying to keep a federal judge from dismissing his complaint accusing the Chicago Cubs of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act when renovating Wrigley Field and redesigning some seating areas. The Cubs, however, are asking the judge to wait til renovations are complete before deciding the case.

Attorney: States will enforce Consumer Financial Protection Bureau standards if feds don't

By Justin Stoltzfus | Apr 25, 2018

With the Trump administration pulling back on some traditional consumer protection activities by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, some states, including Illinois, are stepping in to try to continue the work of the bureau, which had been created under former President Obama, ostensiblyas part of the federal response to the Great Recession.

Black workers OK to continue discrimination suit vs staffer, employers allegedly favoring Hispanics

By DM Herra | Mar 7, 2018

A group of companies facing racial discrimination lawsuits for allegedly passing over black workers in favor of Hispanic workers when hiring temporary workers, failed in their attempt to have the complaints dismissed.

Judge OKs arbitration for fight vs Lyft by drivers fired after reporting other drivers' harassment

By Scott Holland | Feb 26, 2018

A federal judge has dispatched to arbitration a lawsuit brought against ride-hailing service Lyft by a group of former drivers who claim other drivers harassed and intimidated them, leading to retaliation and termination from Lyft when they filed police reports.

Recent ruling in glutamine powder case could have far-reaching implications for class action cases, lawyer says

By Dee Thompson | Feb 2, 2018

A recent ruling by a federal judge that non-Illinois residents cannot participate in a class-action suit has far-reaching implications, according to a local attorney. The ruling came in the case of Joshua DeBernardis v. NBTY and United States Nutrition, the makers of the supplement Body Fortress 100 percent Glutamine Powder.

With regulation in flux, litigation over website accessibility for the blind, other ADA rules, could also remain unsettled

By Angela Underwood | Jan 21, 2018

In the wake of the Trump administration's decision to stop drafting new regulations on the accessibility of "websites, furniture and non-fixed equipment," a labor and employment attorney says this area of law could remain open for a while, as the courts work through the questions in a patchwork of judicial decisions.

Report: Settlement payments to end employment-related class action lawsuits skyrocketed in 2017

By Glenn Minnis | Jan 18, 2018

Top workplace class action lawsuit settlements skyrocketed by nearly $1 billion in 2017, reaching an overall record high of $2.72 billion after a brief one-year decline, a new report indicates.

Attorney: Seventh Circuit's decision to OK AmEx settlement giving lawyers more than class members an 'eye-opener'

By Sara McCleary | Jan 17, 2018

A decision by a federal appeals court to uphold a settlement awarding attorneys more in fees than was paid to class members in total should serve as an "eye-opener" for the public and businesses concerning the nature of class action litigation in U.S. courts, said a local attorney who defends employers against such suits.

Six Flags case could clarify requirements for biometric claims used in class actions

By Karen Kidd | Jan 17, 2018

CHICAGO (Legal Newsline) – A closely watched Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) case could have bearing on Illinois' one-of-a-kind biometric privacy law after an appeals court ruled last month the plaintiff alleged no actual harm, an attorney who defends businesses against such cases said during a recent interview.

New bill before Congress would offer paid leave to many more Americans

By Dee Thompson | Dec 22, 2017

A new bill before Congress could give many more employees across the United States paid leave, replacing a patchwork of state laws on paid employee leave.

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