Latest News

Patient alleges Aspide Medical surgical hernia mesh migrated, caused pain

By Jenie Mallari-Torres | Oct 4, 2018

A North Carolina woman is seeking damages from a Chicago-based distributor for a French company over allegations a surgical mesh caused her injuries.

Judge: Lawyers must justify fee requests for investor suits withdrawn vs Akorn over proxy disclosures

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 27, 2018

A federal judge says a group of lawyers must demonstrate why they should be allowed to collect more than $300,000 in attorney fees for their work representing clients who withdrew a potential class action against generic drug manufacturer Akorn Inc. over its attempted sale to German pharmaceutical company Fresenius.

Judge denies class action status for insurer’s suit against AbbVie, others over testosterone drugs

By Dan Churney | Aug 9, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has barred an Ohio health insurer from pursuing a class action against several pharmaceutical companies, which are already embroiled in massive litigation over their testosterone drugs, saying the thousands of potential claims would be too individualized to be served well by a class action and the insurer’s drug review practices were “unconventional.”

Groupon, 3rd party sellers can't be required to offer ADA accessible seating, lodging options: Judge

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 31, 2018

A federal judge has shut down a disability discrimination lawsuit against Groupon, saying the online bargains site should not be considered a place of public accommodations, and so can’t be required to sell tickets for event seating or vouchers for hotel rooms accessible to those with disabilities.

Judge orders new trial, tosses $140M verdict vs AbbVie over Androgel testosterone drug

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 5, 2018

A federal judge has knocked down a $140 million verdict against pharmaceutical maker AbbVie, ordering a new trial over a man’s claims AbbVie’s Androgel testosterone replacement therapy drug caused him to suffer a heart attack.

Heritage Health sues state of Illinois following denial of patient's Medicaid application

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Jun 11, 2018

A patient's representative filed a lawsuit against the Illinois Department of Human Services and Secretary James Dimas, alleging that the defendants breach their duty to provide medical care and services to those in need with "reasonable promptness."

Appeals judges: Chicago not right court for John Crane's asbestos fraud RICO claims vs Simon Greenstone, Shein Law

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 4, 2018

A federal appeals panel in Chicago has agreed industrial seals and couplings maker John Crane Inc. should be afforded the chance to air its claims two law firms allegedly engaged in racketeering and fraud in the way they pressed asbestos-related personal injury claims against the company in the past. However, the judges also agreed with lower court judges that Chicago federal court is not the right place for John Crane can pursue its claims.

Trial lawyer panel: Plaintiffs' lawyers adapting strategies to fit post-BristolMyersSquibb legal landscape

By Jonathan Bilyk | May 30, 2018

While the U.S. Supreme Court's Bristol Myers Squibb ruling has resulted in some big wins for businesses targeted by the plaintiffs' bar, new strategies and theories deployed by plaintiffs' lawyers may be blunting the further impact of that decision, despite high hopes from some it would largely thwart the ability of out-of-state plaintiffs to sue out-of-state defendants in a favorable court forum.

Verdict much lower, but AbbVie wants $3.2M award tossed in second testosterone class action test trial

By Dan Churney | Apr 30, 2018

North Chicago-based drugmaker AbbVie is resisting what it is calling a jury's “confused and inconsistent” $3.2 million verdict, after the company lost a second trial in Chicago federal court – one in which it was ordered to pay $147 million less than the first trial – over a man’s claims AbbVie allegedly failed to warn its product AndroGel could bring on a heart attack.

Judge orders IL state agencies to move quicker on applications for long-term Medicaid benefits

By Dan Churney | Apr 3, 2018

The Illinois Department of Human Services has 90 days from when basic Medicaid recipients apply to determine if they are eligible for long-term Medicaid, or they will be automatically eligible for the long-term benefits, a federal judge has ruled, brushing aside concerns from state officials the time limit will encourage applicants who may otherwise be ineligible to game the sytem.

Report: Asbestos litigation declines nationwide, slightly in Cook Co., still pervasive in three IL counties

By Jonathan Bilyk and Ann Maher | Mar 23, 2018

As the number of new asbestos lawsuits declined nationally, activity in Illinois’ three hotbeds for asbestos litigation showed few signs of ebbing in 2017, even though the distribution of filing activity has shifted slightly.

From Legal Newsline

Plaintiff lawyers see nationwide settlement as only end for opioid lawsuits

By Daniel Fisher | Mar 7, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO (Legal Newsline) - Plaintiff lawyers meeting in San Francisco last week for a conference on opioid litigation acknowledged that the hundreds of lawsuits they have filed in state and federal court will be difficult to resolve without an unprecedented national settlement whose mechanics are still difficult to predict.

Black workers OK to continue discrimination suit vs staffer, employers allegedly favoring Hispanics

By DM Herra | Mar 7, 2018

A group of companies facing racial discrimination lawsuits for allegedly passing over black workers in favor of Hispanic workers when hiring temporary workers, failed in their attempt to have the complaints dismissed.

Bud's Ambulance allegedly scanned employee fingerprints without consent

By Louie Torres | Mar 2, 2018

An employee has filed a class-action lawsuit against Bud's Ambulance for allegedly violating state law.

IL appeals court upholds dismissal of class action challenging Chicago red light camera program law

By Jonathan Bilyk | Feb 14, 2018

Saying state law designates Chicago’s red light and speed camera enforcement programs as something different from ordinary traffic laws, a state appeals court has again handed a defeat to a class action attempting to overthrow the city’s automated traffic citation program, which annually adds millions of dollars in fines from ticketed motorists to the city’s coffers.

From Legal Newsline

Opioid judge doesn't want media to know details of settlement talks

By Daniel Fisher | Feb 9, 2018

CLEVELAND (Legal Newsline) - The judge overseeing multidistrict litigation against opioid manufacturers and distributors has named the teams of lawyers who will try to negotiate a settlement of hundreds of federal lawsuits - a complex task given parallel investigations and litigation by state attorneys general and potentially conflicting goals of private attorneys and their government counterparts.

Jury declares Abbvie's Androgel didn't cause man's lung clots, Abbvie didn't falsely market medication

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jan 26, 2018

After split verdicts in two prior trials over alleged harmful side effects and alleged misleading marketing of its testosterone replacement drug led to questionable verdicts worth more than $140 million each, drugmaker Abbvie has scored a clean win in the latest jury review of a plaintiff’s claims over the promotion and health impacts of Androgel.

From Legal Newsline

Usual Suspects: Lawyers used to getting their way in MDL process to lead opioid litigation

By Daniel Fisher | Jan 24, 2018

CLEVELAND (Legal Newsline) - There will be a lot of familiar faces in U.S. District Judge Dan Polster’s courtroom in Cleveland on Jan. 31, when lawyers gather for a hearing on multidistrict litigation against the nation’s opioid manufacturers and distributors.

From Madison County Record

Illinois Supreme Court mulling who gets consolidated opioid cases – Cook Co. or Springfield judge

By Record News | Jan 23, 2018

SPRINGFIELD – Supreme Court Justices must decide whether suits that counties continue filing against opioid manufacturers belong with a judge from Cook County or a judge from Springfield.

Contract: Simmons, Meyers firms to split 25 percent cut of Cook County's take from any opioid lawsuit payment

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jan 12, 2018

Lawyers hired by Cook County to help press the county’s case against drug companies over the proliferation of opioid painkillers stand to pocket at least a quarter of Cook County’s cut of any settlement or dollar amount awarded by a court.

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