Latest News

Justice Dept: Class action deal should crumble; Serves only to pay lawyers, promote Lenny & Larry's cookies

By Jonathan Bilyk | Feb 21, 2019

The federal government has asked a federal judge to crumble a deal to end a false labeling class action lawsuit against Lenny & Larry’s, the makers of high-protein cookies, saying the settlement is far too lopsided, as it leaves attorneys with more than $1 million and consumers with perhaps a few crumbs, should they be lucky enough to land a cut of $3 million worth of free cookies.

From Legal Newsline

Trump DOJ acts on threat to trial lawyers who sue on behalf of the government

By Daniel Fisher | Jan 11, 2019

WASHINGTON (Legal Newsline) - The Department of Justice's recent effort to toss lawsuits it says it wasted hundreds of hours investigating is emblematic of a strategy under President Donald Trump to rein in trial lawyers who are using a federal whistleblower law to seek millions of dollars.

Judge: Feds wrong to abruptly cut off funds for Chicago children's psychiatric hospital accused of abuse

By Dan Churney | Dec 31, 2018

A federal judge has ordered a children's psychiatric hospital in Chicago, where patients have allegedly been exposed to “rampant” abuse, should continue receiving Medicare and Medicaid funds while the facility gets the chance to argue the federal government did not give the hospital time to correct problems.

From SE Texas Record

DOJ: A company created to file lawsuits has wasted 1,500 hours of the government's time

By David Yates | Dec 20, 2018

TEXARKANA – The U.S. Department of Justice is asking federal judges around the country to dismiss lawsuits it says are brought by shell companies that misrepresent their true purposes - filing meritless litigation against health care companies.

Relatives sue Swedish Covenant, others for fall allegedly suffered by man who left hospital after stroke

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Aug 20, 2018

Independent executors are suing medical facilities, citing alleged negligent care and supervision.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE: Vice President of Insurance Underwriting Group Charged with Fraudulently Obtaining $13.5 Million in Phony “Matching Deductible” Policies

By Press release submission | Jul 24, 2018

The vice president of an insurance underwriting group fraudulently obtained more than $13.5 million from a corporate client by fraudulently issuing and collecting premium payments on “matching deductible” policies, according to federal criminal charges filed today by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Chicago.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE: 6 Defendants Charged in Federal Investigation Targeting Narcotics Sales in Rockford

By Press release submission | Jul 18, 2018

Six individuals are facing federal criminal charges as part of an investigation into heroin and crack cocaine sales in the Rockford area.

With regulation in flux, litigation over website accessibility for the blind, other ADA rules, could also remain unsettled

By Angela Underwood | Jan 21, 2018

In the wake of the Trump administration's decision to stop drafting new regulations on the accessibility of "websites, furniture and non-fixed equipment," a labor and employment attorney says this area of law could remain open for a while, as the courts work through the questions in a patchwork of judicial decisions.

Sodexo, Comfort Keepers allegedly failed to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning

By Louie Torres | Nov 16, 2017

Two estate representatives are suing Sodexo Inc. and two corporate entities doing business as Comfort Keepers, for alleged negligence.

Federal judge says general contractor had enough control of construction site to prevent fatal accident

By John Sammon | Oct 27, 2017

A federal judge has rejected a call for summary judgment that attempted to dismiss a case involving the death of a construction worker who fell from a second-story balcony that allegedly had been left unsecured.

U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Illinois launches new fraud unit

By Glenn Minnis | Aug 19, 2017

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Illinois has launched a new unit aimed at cutting into the billions of dollars lost to health care fraud schemes.

Judge won't budge on $283M penalty assessed vs Dish Network over 3rd-party telemarketer misdeeds

By Dan Churney | Aug 16, 2017

A downstate federal judge has agreed to slightly modify an injunction against Dish Network, but refused to yield on her order the company pay $283 million in penalties for not keeping a better eye on its telemarketers, who allegedly violated consumer protection laws by making millions of unsolicited calls for Dish.

Judge: Procedural question won't derail federal discrimination suit over Tinley Park low income housing

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 20, 2017

A Chicago federal judge has cleared federal lawyers to continue their housing discrimination lawsuit against the village of Tinley Park over the fate of a low-income housing development, saying the task of filing such lawsuits can be delegated to other lawyers within the Department of Justice if the office specifically authorized by federal law to oversee such enforcement actions is vacant.

Tinley sues ex-planner over low income apartments; fed judge asked to combine with feds' suit vs Tinley

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 26, 2017

As Tinley Park village officials await a federal judge’s ruling on whether a legal question could prevent the U.S. Justice Department from suing Village Hall for housing discrimination, the village’s ex-development director has asked a federal judge to simultaneously consider her request to dismiss a lawsuit Tinley Park brought against her for allegedly making faulty decisions that led the village to come under federal scrutiny and pay $2.45 million to settle claims brought by the would-be developers of a stalled controversial low-income housing project planned for Tinley’s downtown.

Dish Network hit with $283M penalty for third-party telemarketing practices

By Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro | Jun 23, 2017

A Springfield federal judge has placed Dish Network on the hook for a fine of more than $280 million for alleged violations of federal telemarketing law, even though the violations were committed by third-party contractors. And other companies should take note of the judge's ruling, said a lawyer who specializes in defenses against similar legal actions.

Tinley Park seeks to dismiss federal discrimination lawsuit over low-income housing project

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 12, 2017

The fate of a low-income housing development in Tinley Park could yet turn on the question of whether the President of the United States must appoint someone to serve as the overseer of the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division for the Justice Department to legally file housing discrimination lawsuits.

Seventh Circuit: Patent law can't be used to press asbestos exposure liability claims

By Scott Holland | Jun 8, 2017

A federal appeals panel in Chicago has upheld lower courts’ dismissal of several asbestos exposure lawsuits brought against door maker Weyerhaeuser Company and Owens-Illinois Inc., saying their dispute with Weyerhauser should be handled under Wisconsin’s workers compensation law, and their claims against Owens-Illinois don’t belong in court at all.

Cook County judge indicted over mortgage fraud scheme

By Jonathan Bilyk | Apr 12, 2017

Cook County Judge Jessica Arong O'Brien has been indicted for her alleged role in a mortgage fraud scheme, which took place a few years before she was elected to the Cook County bench.

Steele pleads guilty to conspiracy charges stemming from Prenda Law internet porn shakedowns

By Cook County Record | Mar 7, 2017

John L. Steele, an indicted Chicago lawyer who served as one of the principals at Prenda Law, has pleaded guilty to federal charges stemming from his role in an alleged shakedown scheme allegedly designed to entrap and extract millions of dollars in settlements from those accused of illegally downloading internet porn.

Bosnian Muslim congregation can take to trial lawsuit over zoning denial for Des Plaines mosque

By Jonathan Bilyk | Feb 27, 2017

Saying he believed the evidence could suggest the city of Des Plaines discriminated against a local Islamic congregation when it denied their request for a permit to build a new community center in one of the city’s business districts, a federal judge has decided to let the congregation and the city take their legal fight to trial.

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