Latest News

AT&T call center workers hit employer with class action, claim were shorted OT pay

By Tomas Kassahun | Nov 1, 2018

A group of employees who work at an AT&T call center have filed a lawsuit against the telecommunications company over allegations they were not paid for overtime work.

Goodyear, General Motors sued by driver whose car overturned

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Oct 29, 2018

A driver whose vehicle overturned after one of his tires failed, causing permanent injury, is suing Goodyear and General Motors for allegedly selling unreasonably dangerous products.

Workers comp, health insurers for Illinois towns add to mass of municipal opioid lawsuits

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 15, 2018

Organizations providing workers comp insurance and employee health insurance for more than 200 Illinois local governments have joined the mass of lawsuits against drug makers, distributors and others associated with the spread of so-called opioid painkillers.

Attorney: Court's denial of Lincolnshire right-to-work ordinance could forebode SCOTUS fight

By Gabriel Neves | Oct 9, 2018

A recent decision by a federal appeals court in Chicago likely forebodes a legal fight before the U.S. Supreme Court over the fate of so-called local right-to-work zones in Illinois and throughout the country.

From Legal Newsline

Opioid lawsuits should proceed, magistrate tells MDL judge

By Daniel Fisher | Oct 9, 2018

A magistrate judge recommended that a bellwether trial against the opioid industry proceed, rejecting nearly all the arguments presented by manufacturers, distributors and retailers in their motions to dismiss hundreds of lawsuits accusing them of causing a national crisis.

Appeals judges: Lincolnshire, other towns can't create right-to-work zones, despite home rule powers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 1, 2018

Saying to find otherwise would create “catastrophic” consequences for labor law in Illinois and across the country, a federal appeals panel has backed a federal judge’s decision to toss an attempt by a northwest suburban village to use its home rule powers to create a local right-to-work zone within its borders.

Wendy's sued by workers who claim broke law when scanned fingerprints for use with punch clock

By Cook County Record | Sep 24, 2018

Fast food chain Wendy's is among the latest businesses operating in Illinois to be sued by workers for allegedly violating workers' rights under an Illinois biometrics privacy law by scanning employee fingerprints for use with its employee punch clock systems.

Appeals panel: Parents can sue paint makers for kids' lead screening costs, even though covered by Medicaid

By Dan Churney | Sep 11, 2018

A Chicago appellate court has overturned a lower court’s dismissal of a class action by parents who wanted paint companies to pay for mandatory tests of their children to see if the children had lead in their blood, finding the parents still hold the right to sue the companies, even though Medicaid footed the bill.

Judge: Failure to break out fees, other 'miscellaneous charges' made initial collection letter 'misleading'

By Mary Ann Magnell | Aug 27, 2018

Saying the debt collector's letter was "materially misleading," a Chicago federal judge has given the green light to a lawsuit brought by a woman who accused a collection firm of failing to itemize fees and other charges tacked on to an alleged debt owed to a car rental company.

Lyons, Bedford Park, Summit file opioid lawsuits; legal actions hit medical societies as defendants

By Dan Churney | Aug 20, 2018

Three more Cook County communities are suing opioid makers and distributors in connection with the opioid epidemic. But unlike dozens of other Chicago-area towns that have already taken similar court action, the three towns are suing separately, rather than together, and have added medical societies as defendants.

Judge denies class action status for insurer’s suit against AbbVie, others over testosterone drugs

By Dan Churney | Aug 9, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has barred an Ohio health insurer from pursuing a class action against several pharmaceutical companies, which are already embroiled in massive litigation over their testosterone drugs, saying the thousands of potential claims would be too individualized to be served well by a class action and the insurer’s drug review practices were “unconventional.”

More Cook County towns sue over opioids; Edelson again includes doctors to keep court action local

By Dan Churney | Jul 26, 2018

Another group of Cook County communities have launched a lawsuit, which they want to stay in Cook County rather than federal court, against a number of opioid makers, distributors and doctors, alleging they pushed prescription opioids on the public despite knowing the drugs were dangerously addictive.

Abbvie wins another bellwether trial amid mass action over Androgel testosterone drug

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jun 15, 2018

A federal jury has handed a win to North Chicago-based drugmaker Abbvie, as it continues to seek to fend off a mass of legal claims accusing the company’s testosterone replacement therapy drug, Androgel, of causing heart attacks and other cardiovascular conditions.

Speedway worker fingerprint scan lawsuit heads back to Cook County court; Judge: No harm to plaintiff

By DM Herra | Jun 8, 2018

A lawsuit that claims Speedway gas stations didn’t follow state law in collecting employee fingerprints is back in state court, after a federal district court denied Speedway’s motion to dismiss - while at the same time agreeing that the plaintiff suffered no injury.

Cook suburbs join together to sue opioid makers; doctors added as defendants to keep case out of federal court

By Scott Holland | May 23, 2018

Ten Cook County suburbs have sued opioid makers in connection with what they allege is widespread drug abuse and overdoses from so-called opioid prescription painkillers. And in a bid to ensure their lawsuit doesn’t get shipped off to a Cleveland federal court to be consolidated with the bulk of the opioid litigation pending in U.S. courts, the plaintiffs have also tacked on as defendants three doctors they accused of operating a “pill mill.”

Judge pulls to the curb class action vs city, ParkChicago vendors over app users' parking tickets

By Jonathan Bilyk | May 21, 2018

A class action lawsuit accusing the city of Chicago and its curbside parking meters vendors of wrongly issuing parking tickets to motorists who actually had fed the meters using the ParkChicago smartphone app, has been dismissed.

Class action suit says drug companies caused opioid crisis, heightened insurance costs

By Dan Churney | May 7, 2018

A Chicago class-action lawyer has filed a 97-page lawsuit in Chicago federal court against 13 drug companies and distributors, on behalf of a woman who alleges the companies promoted opioid use, knowing such painkillers were dangerously addictive, jacking up people's health insurance costs.

Fair Maps Amendment not called for vote, deadline passes to place it on November 2018 ballot

By Jonathan Bilyk | May 7, 2018

Illinois voters will not get a chance to weigh in on the question of whether Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan and other legislative leaders in the Democratic-controlled Illinois General Assembly should continue to hold the keys to drawing the state's legislative district maps, after the leaders of the state House and Senate refused to call a vote for a constitutional amendment designed to curtail their influence over the process.

From Legal Newsline

Judge in massive opioid case watching plaintiff lawyer spending, orders them to fly coach

By Daniel Fisher | May 2, 2018

CLEVELAND (Legal Newsline) - The judge overseeing multidistrict litigation against the opioid industry ordered plaintiffs’ attorneys to keep monthly records of the time they spend on their cases down to a tenth of an hour and imposed strict rules on who can collect fees, in an effort to prevent the excesses that have drawn criticism in other class actions and mass tort cases.

Judge delivers two plaintiffs to arbitration, despite TQL's slowness in finding, revealing arbitration clauses

By Karen Kidd | Apr 30, 2018

Two plaintiffs who joined a class action suit against an Ohio-based shipping services provider over accusations of not paying overtime to employees are no longer part of the case and their claims could be heading into arbitration, despite the company's tardiness in presenting the court with the employment agreements containing the arbitration requirements.

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