Latest News

Class action vs Chicago over distracted driving tickets OK to continue; City: Not really a moving violation

By Jonathan Bilyk | Feb 12, 2019

A Cook County judge, for now, has allowed a class action lawsuit to proceed against the city of Chicago, brought by a group of people who claimed the city wrongly prosecuted tens of thousands of distracted driving tickets.

Two IL labor unions partner to sue opioid makers, distributors, promoters; Edelson firm to represent

By Jonathan Bilyk | Feb 7, 2019

Two unions have added their names to the long and growing list of organizations suing the makers and distributors of opioid painkillers.

Judge: Employees classified together for overtime exemption can sue together for overtime pay

By D.M. Herra | Feb 7, 2019

A federal judge refused to break up a class action lawsuit against freight service Total Quality Logistics, finding the company’s own policies undermine its argument that the class members are too different to qualify for class certification.

Appeals panel: Woman can't sue Chicago Food 4 Less, snow removal crew, for icy slip-and-fall

By John Sammon | Jan 4, 2019

A woman who said she broke her ankle when she slipped and fell on ice in the parking lot of a Chicago Food 4 Less store can't sue the store or the company hired to clear ice and snow from the lot, a state appeals court has ruled.

American Academy of Actuaries members accuse board of violating bylaws

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Jan 4, 2019

Members of the American Academy of Actuaries have filed a class action lawsuit against the organization's board over allegations it violated bylaws.

Appeals panel says woman's claims Aldi failed to preserve video of her fall don't check out

By Gabriel Neves | Dec 28, 2018

A state appeals court has granted a win to supermarket chain Aldi against a woman who claimed she was injured when she slipped and fell in the store, and then accused the retailer of failing to preserve evidence when no surveillance video could be found recording the incident.

From Legal Newsline

Opioid judge rejects dismissal plea, orders first lawsuits to trial

By Daniel Fisher | Dec 20, 2018

CLEVELAND (Legal Newsline) - Opioid manufacturers and distributors lost their long-shot bid to end more than 1,000 lawsuits against them as the federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation rejected their motions to dismiss and ordered the first cases to trial next year.

From Legal Newsline

Opioid plaintiffs: A small percentage of pill shipments were 'suspicious.' Or maybe it's nearly all of them

By Daniel Fisher | Dec 14, 2018

CLEVELAND (Legal Newsline) - Forced to identify opioid prescriptions they say were “suspicious” and never should have been shipped, Ohio cities and counties came up with a rough estimate. Very rough.

Judge tosses suit that alleged Chicago schools, bus companies bilked Medicaid for millions

By Dan Churney | Dec 6, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has kicked to the curb a suit by a former busing contracts manager for Chicago Public Schools, who alleged bus companies and school officials defrauded Medicaid in connection with transportation of special needs students.

Goodyear, General Motors sued by driver whose car overturned

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Oct 29, 2018

A driver whose vehicle overturned after one of his tires failed, causing permanent injury, is suing Goodyear and General Motors for allegedly selling unreasonably dangerous products.

Workers comp, health insurers for Illinois towns add to mass of municipal opioid lawsuits

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 15, 2018

Organizations providing workers comp insurance and employee health insurance for more than 200 Illinois local governments have joined the mass of lawsuits against drug makers, distributors and others associated with the spread of so-called opioid painkillers.

Attorney: Court's denial of Lincolnshire right-to-work ordinance could forebode SCOTUS fight

By Gabriel Neves | Oct 9, 2018

A recent decision by a federal appeals court in Chicago likely forebodes a legal fight before the U.S. Supreme Court over the fate of so-called local right-to-work zones in Illinois and throughout the country.

From Legal Newsline

Opioid lawsuits should proceed, magistrate tells MDL judge

By Daniel Fisher | Oct 9, 2018

A magistrate judge recommended that a bellwether trial against the opioid industry proceed, rejecting nearly all the arguments presented by manufacturers, distributors and retailers in their motions to dismiss hundreds of lawsuits accusing them of causing a national crisis.

Appeals judges: Lincolnshire, other towns can't create right-to-work zones, despite home rule powers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 1, 2018

Saying to find otherwise would create “catastrophic” consequences for labor law in Illinois and across the country, a federal appeals panel has backed a federal judge’s decision to toss an attempt by a northwest suburban village to use its home rule powers to create a local right-to-work zone within its borders.

Wendy's sued by workers who claim broke law when scanned fingerprints for use with punch clock

By Cook County Record | Sep 24, 2018

Fast food chain Wendy's is among the latest businesses operating in Illinois to be sued by workers for allegedly violating workers' rights under an Illinois biometrics privacy law by scanning employee fingerprints for use with its employee punch clock systems.

Appeals panel: Parents can sue paint makers for kids' lead screening costs, even though covered by Medicaid

By Dan Churney | Sep 11, 2018

A Chicago appellate court has overturned a lower court’s dismissal of a class action by parents who wanted paint companies to pay for mandatory tests of their children to see if the children had lead in their blood, finding the parents still hold the right to sue the companies, even though Medicaid footed the bill.

Judge: Failure to break out fees, other 'miscellaneous charges' made initial collection letter 'misleading'

By Mary Ann Magnell | Aug 27, 2018

Saying the debt collector's letter was "materially misleading," a Chicago federal judge has given the green light to a lawsuit brought by a woman who accused a collection firm of failing to itemize fees and other charges tacked on to an alleged debt owed to a car rental company.

Lyons, Bedford Park, Summit file opioid lawsuits; legal actions hit medical societies as defendants

By Dan Churney | Aug 20, 2018

Three more Cook County communities are suing opioid makers and distributors in connection with the opioid epidemic. But unlike dozens of other Chicago-area towns that have already taken similar court action, the three towns are suing separately, rather than together, and have added medical societies as defendants.

Judge denies class action status for insurer’s suit against AbbVie, others over testosterone drugs

By Dan Churney | Aug 9, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has barred an Ohio health insurer from pursuing a class action against several pharmaceutical companies, which are already embroiled in massive litigation over their testosterone drugs, saying the thousands of potential claims would be too individualized to be served well by a class action and the insurer’s drug review practices were “unconventional.”

More Cook County towns sue over opioids; Edelson again includes doctors to keep court action local

By Dan Churney | Jul 26, 2018

Another group of Cook County communities have launched a lawsuit, which they want to stay in Cook County rather than federal court, against a number of opioid makers, distributors and doctors, alleging they pushed prescription opioids on the public despite knowing the drugs were dangerously addictive.

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