Latest News

Orland fire distict didn't violate alarm company's rights by inking exclusive deal with rival vendor: Judge

By Jonathan Bilyk | Aug 3, 2018

A federal judge has ruled a southwest suburban fire protection district didn’t violate the rights of a company that installs and monitors commercial fire alarms by first lobbying the villages of Orland Park and Orland Hills to require the installation of a certain kind of fire alarm system, and then inking a contract with a competing company to provide the equipment needed for those alarm systems, effectively closing off their district to competitors.

Ex-St. Stanislaus parish music director loses job discrimination case; ministerial exception applies

By Chandra Lye | Aug 1, 2018

A federal judge has closed the book on age and nationality discrimination allegations brought against the Catholic Bishop of Chicago by a Polish former parish music director, as the judge said the music director and organist should be considered a "ministerial" employee, and thus exempt from certain anti-discrimination employment rules.

Judge tosses disciplined officers' suit over Cook sheriff's Merit Board makeup; Lawyer: Proves 'circle of no relief'

By Jonathan Bilyk | Aug 1, 2018

Saying the lawsuit was premature, a Cook County judge has dismissed a legal action brought by Cook County sheriff’s officers, who contend disciplinary cases against them should be tossed because the disciplinary board’s members weren’t legally appointed at the time the disciplinary cases were filed. A lawyer for the disciplined officers says the decision actually bolsters a parallel case brought in federal court.

Black pipefitters can take to trial claims union allowed contractors to discriminate when hiring

By DM Herra | Aug 1, 2018

A federal judge granted a partial victory to a group of African American union pipefitters claiming their union failed to protect them from racial discrimination, allowing them to proceed to trial on some of the claims in a lawsuit, which asserts the union allowed contractors to circumvent hiring rules to avoid hiring black workers.

Lawsuit: City rules allow Ald. Burke to turn Chicago Workers Comp office into patronage 'army'

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 31, 2018

Saying the mayor’s refusal to wrest control of the city’s workers compensation division has allowed Chicago’s most powerful alderman to turn the office into a political patronage “army,” giving preferential treatment to loyal city workers, a lawsuit brought by a city worker who helped expose the Hired Trucks scandal has asked a federal judge to declare unconstitutional Ald. Ed Burke’s management of the office that handles Chicago city workers’ workers comp claims, and force Mayor Rahm Emanuel to oversee operations there, despite city rules delegating the task to Burke.

Federal court dismisses long-running bankruptcy fee-fixing claim vs BMS, perhaps for last time

By John Breslin | Jul 30, 2018

CHICAGO - The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois dismissed a claim that a company providing software services in bankruptcy proceedings was involved in a fee-fixing conspiracy, according to a July 2 ruling.

Lawsuit: Abbvie's after-hours share offer adjustment cost investors $100M

By Scott Holland | Jul 30, 2018

A group of Abbvie investors who say they and others like them collectively lost more than $100 million when the pharmaceutical giant used an after-hours press release to adjust a share price tender offer, has sued the company in a federal securities class action filed July 26 in Chicago.

Court: Woman's ex-employer can sue her because she told customers she was fired for getting pregnant

By Sandra Lane | Jul 27, 2018

A federal judge has determined a woman's former supervisor can sue her for defamation, after the former employee allegedly told customers and others her supervisor had fired her for gettting pregnant.

Court again sides with employee over non-solicitation agreement, part of a pattern, says attorney

By John Breslin | Jul 27, 2018

A federal court has ruled in favor of an employee involved in a trade secrets and non-solicitation dispute with a former employer, continuing a pattern by Chicago federal judges of overturning, or limiting the scope, of employment agreements, according to a Chicago employment lawyer.

Harvey, pension funds reach deal on dividing up embargoed state money, end court fight over pension funding

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 27, 2018

In a deal that could set a precedent for other financially struggling municipalities to follow, the city of Harvey has reached a deal with its police and firefighter pension funds to end a court fight over how much of the money Harvey gets from the state of Illinois the city should be allowed to spend on current day-to-day operations, rather than police and fire department retirees’ pensions.

Cook County to get just under $2 million from LCD manufacturers settlement

By Kyla Asbury | Jul 26, 2018

Cook County will receive about $2 million under a recent settlement with manufacturers of liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors.

More Cook County towns sue over opioids; Edelson again includes doctors to keep court action local

By Dan Churney | Jul 26, 2018

Another group of Cook County communities have launched a lawsuit, which they want to stay in Cook County rather than federal court, against a number of opioid makers, distributors and doctors, alleging they pushed prescription opioids on the public despite knowing the drugs were dangerously addictive.

Judge dismisses Muslim family's discrimination allegations vs Chicago's Ancona School

By Takesha Thomas | Jul 26, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has sided with a Chicago private school in a lawsuit brought by the parents of Muslim student, who had claimed the school's decision to essentially disinvite him from reenrolling at the school amounted to religious discrimination.

Limousine driver claims Bridgeport Art Center guest assaulted him

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Jul 26, 2018

A limousine driver is suing James Stone and East Bank Storage on 35th Street Inc., which does business as Bridgeport Art Center, citing alleged assault, failure to protect and negligence.

Judge: Edelson can try to bar Bandas 'pro objectors' from practicing, collecting fees in IL

By Jonathan Bilyk | Jul 25, 2018

A little over five months since denying one of Chicago’s leading class action plaintiffs’ firms the chance to pursue racketeering charges against another group of lawyers accused of acting as “professional objectors” to extort payments, a Chicago federal judge said she will allow the Edelson P.C. firm to move ahead with one final remaining element of their lawsuit – an attempt to secure a court order restricting the ability of those lawyers to practice law in Illinois, and so limit their ability to collect on a $225,000 payday from Edelson.

Bartender accuses Four Corners of exaggerating tip amounts on official reports, shorting worker wages

By Dan Churney | Jul 25, 2018

A onetime Chicago bartender has served up a putative class-action lawsuit against the Four Corners tavern restaurant group, alleging his former employer shorted employees pay at its 15 bars around the city, paying less than the required minimum wage by overstating on pay stubs and W-2 tax forms how much employees received in tips.

Judge: Illinois condo law not meant to control 'reasonable' fees for electronic condo sale documents

By Dan Churney | Jul 20, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has tossed a putative class action lawsuit by a trio of onetime suburban condominium owners, who alleged they paid excessive fees for state-required documents when they sold their units, saying Illinois condo laws are not meant to control fees.

Judge: No 'risk of harm' to Rexnord workers from fingerprint scan time clocks; case sent back to Cook courts

By Scott Holland | Jul 20, 2018

A federal judge has kicked back to Cook County court a class action lawsuit accusing manufacturer Rexnord of violating an Illinois state privacy law by requiring employees to scan their fingerprints when using employee punch clocks to track work hours.

Federal lawsuit: Cook Co. makes it too difficult to appeal big tax bills; state law only enables

By Scott Holland | Jul 18, 2018

A group of property owners have filed a federal complaint challenging the legality, not only of their Cook County property tax assessments, but also of the state law that governs the assessment process and which they said aided the county's efforts to make it overly difficult to effectively appeal tax bills.

Lawsuit: Woman says lawyer referred lawsuit vs her to his father while still representing her in related action

By Scott Holland | Jul 17, 2018

A New York woman is accusing her former attorney of improperly referring a lawsuit against her to his father while still representing her in a related action.

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