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Appeals panel: Lawyer's lawsuit vs condo board over parking space groundless, but not a SLAPP

By Dan Churney | Nov 13, 2018

An Illinois appeals panel says a Loop condo owner’s lawsuit against his association board over a parking space was groundless, but the man shouldn’t be forced to pay the board’s legal defense costs, because the lawsuit didn’t come in retaliation for the board’s prior legal action against him.

ExxonMobil still off hook for worker's severe injuries at Joliet plant in 2013, state appeals court rules

By Karen Kidd | Nov 13, 2018

A state appeals panel has said ExxonMobil can't be held accountable for severe injuries suffered by a worker in a mishap at the company's Joliet refinery, affirming a Cook County judge's findings that the oil and gas company had limited or no knowledge of the contract employer's allegedly unsafe procedures on the job site.

Appeals court: No new trial for man who sued Hyatt, others, over trip-and-fall at trade show

By Gabriel Neves | Nov 12, 2018

A state appeals panel says a man won't get a new trial in his lawsuit against the Hyatt Regency hotel in Chicago, saying a Cook County jury was not wrong in finding him 100 percent responsible for the injuries he says he suffered when he tripped and fell over a missing floor tile covered by carpet.

Judges: Dermatologist failed to prove Mayo Clinic's 'fair' rating to prospective employer caused harm

By Cook County Record | Nov 10, 2018

A federal appeals panel has terminated a doctor's lawsuit against the Mayo Clinic, saying her former employer's decision to rate the doctor's performance as "fair" was an unfair breach of a contract clause forbidding the hospital system from saying anything negative about her to prospective future employers.

Appeals panel: Ameren wrong to fire worker for lawfully having concealed firearm in car at work

By Cook County Record | Nov 9, 2018

A federal appeals panel in Chicago has said a federal judge in central Illinois was wrong to rule against an Ameren employee who the company says was fired for violating a workplace violence policy, after he allegedly made threats and kept a concealed firearm in his vehicle while at work.

Appeals court: Romanucci & Blandin firm maybe on hook for fees to lawyer who rep'd client's husband

By Scott Holland | Nov 7, 2018

A state appeals court says law firm Romanucci & Blandin can’t necessarily use the Illinois frauds statute to escape a lawsuit brought by another lawyer who claimed their refusal to pay her $7,000 in fees violated a deal she had struck with one of the firm's clients to represent that client’s husband in court and be paid from funds the client would win in the settlement of a lawsuit being prosecuted by an attorney from the Romanucci & Blandin firm.

After SCOTUS decision, others watching California's public nuisance lead paint action copied elsewhere

By Gabriel Neves | Nov 6, 2018

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision to deny paint manufacturers' appeal of a California ruling requiring them to pay more than $400 million for lead paint remediation, companies could face significantly greater odds of litigation under the theory of "public nuisance."

Cook Co. judge wrong to quickly toss Quinn's suit over Chicago mayor term limits referendum: Appeals court

By Scott Holland | Nov 6, 2018

Former Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has secured, for now, new life for his attempt to place on the ballot two referendums, including one to slap term limits on Chicago’s mayor, and another to create an elected consumer advocate post in the city.

Appeals court: Metro Water District can't use state law to escape lawsuit from worker who fell 29 feet into tank

By Jonathan Bilyk | Nov 6, 2018

A state appeals court has refused to flush a lawsuit against the organization responsible for treating Cook County’s sewage, which was brought by a worker who was hurt in a fall from a ladder into a mostly empty treatment tank, as the judges said the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago can’t use immunity often granted under state law to escape the lawsuit, when it had earlier declared its officials didn’t know about the condition that led to the worker’s injuries.

Appeals panel voids $27M for ex-Allstate portfolio analysts who said were maligned in Allstate SEC filings

By Scott Holland | Oct 31, 2018

A Chicago federal appeals panel has vacated a $27 million award previously given to former Allstate portfolio security analysts who accused the company of ruining their careers by allegedly incorrectly reporting to federal regulators the analysts had padded their bonus pay while pension funds were shorted.

Appeals panel affirms $1.5M award to woman who chipped tooth on soda can in 2013 collision

By Karen Kidd | Oct 30, 2018

An expert witness' failure to produce financial documents is leaving an Edwardsville transportation company on the hook for a $1.5 million jury award to a woman who chipped her tooth on a soda can during a rear-end collision in 2013.

Appeals panel: $10M arbitrator’s class award invalid; Arbitration should have involved 1, not 175 employees

By Dan Churney | Oct 25, 2018

A Chicago federal appellate court has struck down a $10 million arbitration award to loan officers in a class action against Waterstone Mortgage, which alleged the company shorted officers on overtime pay, saying arbitration should only have involved the plaintiff, not another 174 employees who joined the action.

Kavanaugh assigned to review appeals from Seventh Circuit; Remains to be seen how will affect courts

By Carrie Bradon | Oct 25, 2018

Justice Brett Kavanaugh has been assigned to review appeals from the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, replacing Justice Elena Kagan in that task. However, the change may not ultimately mean much.

Springfield judge overstepped in OKing landowners' challenge to Ameren power line eminent domain cases: IL Sup Ct

By Dan Churney | Oct 24, 2018

The Supreme Court of Illinois has unanimously yanked the plug on a downstate court’s ruling that found the Illinois Commerce Commission breached due process by not notifying landowners their properties were in the path of proposed power lines, saying the lower court overstepped its authority, although two justices disagreed with the majority’s reasoning, calling it a “threat to individual rights.”

Chicago didn't violate woman's rights by waiting 6 months to fine for high weeds, appeals panel says

By Dan Churney | Oct 22, 2018

A federal appeals panel has upheld a lower court’s ruling Chicago ordinance inspectors did not violate a woman’s right to due process by waiting six months after an inspection to cite her for allegedly having overgrown weeds, saying that period was not excessive and she got her due process at her administrative hearing.

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