Latest News

Supreme Court: Teamsters local isn't on hook for $2M HQ build, lease deal, because members didn't OK contract

By Scott Holland | Mar 22, 2019

The Illinois Supreme Court says a builder can't force a local chapter of the Teamsters to pay a $2 million judgment for breaching the contract under which the builder built and leased the union a new headquarters, because one of the union's officers executed the deal without the consent of the membership, voiding the contract with the builder.

Appeals court: Illinois Court of Claims not really a court of law; Handles single claims vs state, not class actions

By Dan Churney | Mar 22, 2019

A Chicago appeals panel has backed up a Cook County judge's refusal to allow a class action lawsuit, which accuses the University of Illinois of favoring politically connected applicants, to proceed, saying the Illinois Court of Claims, where such a lawsuit would need to be heard, can't handle class action lawsuits.

Appeals court: Farmers Insurance must fund Oakton C.C. worker's defense vs coworker's defamation suit

By Takesha Thomas | Mar 22, 2019

Farmers Insurance will not be able to sidestep a coverage claim from an Oakton Community College employee who is being sued by a coworker for allegedly defaming her by posting her photo on fliers posted on campus to advertise a workshop titled “Problem Employees and the Games They Play.”

Appeals court: Lawsuit to continue vs Wilmington over children's Kankakee River drowning deaths

By Cook County Record | Mar 20, 2019

A lawsuit will continue against a Will County city over the drowning deaths of two children in the Kankakee River, a state appeals court has ruled.

IL Supreme Court denies abortion funding law challenge; Dissent: 'Political question' claims deserve hearing

By Jonathan Bilyk | Mar 20, 2019

A group of abortion foes have lost their bid to undo an Illinois law making all Illinois taxpayers foot the bill for what they say will be tens of thousands of abortions per year, as the Illinois Supreme Court refused to take up the case. Three justices, though, said the majority was wrong to let the state sidestep the challenge so easily.

Irish bank can't be sued in U.S. court over loans made in Chicago Spire negotiations

By Dan Churney | Mar 19, 2019

A federal judge on March 14 ruled an Irish national bank cannot be sued by a development company for allegedly sabotaging the Chicago Spire skyscraper project by selling off the company's loans.

Bankruptcy code not intended to 'shelter' Chicago parking, traffic ticket scofflaws: Appeals panel

By Scott Holland | Mar 18, 2019

A federal appeals panel has determined that a bankruptcy filing shouldn’t offer protection from traffic fines.

Appeals court: Clergy housing allowance tax exemption rules are constitutional

By Dan Churney | Mar 18, 2019

A federal appeals panel has reversed a lower court ruling that said tax-free housing allowances for clergy breached the separation between church and state, finding the long history of such exemptions in the United States allows churches, not government, to properly "advance religion."

Appeals court: IL lost no money, but woman can still sue optometrist for alleged insurance fraud in state's name

By Dan Churney | Mar 15, 2019

An Illinois appeals panel says the bankruptcy trustee for the estate of a woman who once worked for a suburban Chicago optometrist can press an insurance fraud lawsuit on behalf of the state of Illinois against that optometry practice, even if the alleged fraud had not cost the state any money.

Appeals court: IL lost no money, but woman can still sue optometrist for alleged insurance fraud in state's name

By Dan Churney | Mar 15, 2019

An Illinois appeals panel says the bankruptcy trustee for the estate of a woman who once worked for a suburban Chicago optometrist can press an insurance fraud lawsuit on behalf of the state of Illinois against that optometry practice, even if the alleged fraud had not cost the state any money.

Man waited decades too long to launch his legal dogfight over fate of WWII fighter, appeals court says

By D.M. Herra | Mar 14, 2019

A federal appeals court last week clarified a ruling confirming ownership of a World War II fighter plane that has been at the heart of a legal dogfight.

Appeals panel: Cook County Circuit Clerk continuing to charge improper filing fees, despite revised policies

By Scott Holland | Mar 13, 2019

A state appeals court has again ruled Cook County Circuit Court Dorothy Brown is requesting unauthorized filing fees from parties involved in lawsuits.

Federal appeals court rules GE doesn't have to remove polluted soil where Morrison factory stood

By Dan Churney | Mar 12, 2019

A Chicago federal appellate panel has upheld a lower court ruling that said owners of land contaminated by chemicals from a General Electric plant in northwestern Illinois cannot force the company to remove the polluted soil, because the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency is only calling for GE to contain the contamination.

Appeals panel: Chicago must give a day's warning before ticketing cars on streets scheduled for sweeping

By Scott Holland | Mar 12, 2019

A state appeals court said the city of Chicago needs to provide 24 hours of warning time before it begins writing tickets for cars parked in the way of street sweepers.

Union lawsuit claiming right to not represent non-union members could upset public labor relations: Attorney

By John Breslin | Mar 7, 2019

A labor union has won the right to move forward with a unique challenge that emerged in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year on whether non-union workers should pay fair share fees for representation. If it succeeds, the lawsuit could upset management-labor relations for government employers, a labor lawyer says.

Appeals court: Rumors about woman sleeping to top could leave employer on hook for discrimination suit

By John Breslin | Mar 6, 2019

Legal experts are describing as significant a federal appeals court ruling that determined rumors falsely hinting a woman slept with management to advance in her company, could leave an employer on the hook for a sex discrimination violation under the Civil Rights Act.

Chicago tenant gets second chance to argue danger posed by landlord's broken concrete floors

By D.M. Herra | Mar 6, 2019

A woman suing her landlord over the degraded floors in her building’s parking garage will have another chance to argue her case in court, after a state appeals panel reversed a lower court’s decision in favor of the property owner.

Wilmette man asks court to reconsider if cops violated his rights to photo, video neighbors in public

By Scott Holland | Mar 4, 2019

A Wilmette man is asking the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider his lawsuit accusing the village of Wilmette of violating his constitutional rights by asking him to stop tracking his neighbors’ activities to prove they were violating condo association rules.

Appeals panel: Aurora cop who spied on ex-wife shouldn't lose his job, suspension sufficient

By Scott Holland | Feb 28, 2019

A state appeals panel said an Aurora police officer can keep his job despite spying on his ex-wife.

Appeals court: State can strip Glenview hospice's tax exempt status, because it does too little charity

By Dan Churney | Feb 27, 2019

An Illinois appeals panel has determined state tax officials were right to deny tax-exempt status to a suburban Chicago hospice center, because, even though it shares land with a sister palliative facility that is exempt, less than one percent of the hospice's $30 million annual revenue went to charity.

The Record Network