Latest News

Appeals panel: Taxpayers' rights not violated by county assessments raising property taxes in only one township

By Scott Holland | Oct 12, 2018

A federal appeals panel has shelved an attempt by a group of downstate landowners to sue their county for setting property tax bills after only reassessing the properties in their township, effectively raising their tax bills by 25 percent, allegedly violating their constitutional rights to equal protection.

Appeals court: Homeowners can't use annexation agreement to sue Tinley Park over drainage woes

By Cook County Record | Oct 9, 2018

Homeowners in Tinley Park have lost another round in their bid to hold the village of Tinley Park responsible for water drainage issues at their house, despite an annexation agreement that required a developer to install storm sewer drains years ago the homeowners assert would have solved their water issues.

Abbott Labs can't move out-of-state plaintiffs' Depakote effects lawsuits out of Cook County: Appeals panel

By DM Herra | Oct 4, 2018

Abbott Labs can't move out-of-state plaintiffs' Depakote effects lawsuits out of Cook County: Appeals panel

Appeals court: Night club not on hook for man's brain injury allegedly caused by bouncer opening door

By Charmaine Little | Oct 3, 2018

A state appeals court has upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit that attempted to make a night club in suburban Burbank pay for the injuries suffered by a man who was struck by an outward opening door on New Year's Eve 2012, saying the man should have recognized the danger of standing in front of the door when the club had posted a sign denying reentry to anyone outside.

Judge: Menard's, retailers not expected to always keep parking lot in 'perfect condition' to avoid trip-and-falls

By John Breslin | Oct 2, 2018

Home improvement retail chain Menard's cannot be held liable for an injury allegedly suffered by a woman who tripped over a crack in the parking lot of one of its northwest suburban stores, a federal judge has ruled, saying the retailer cannot be expected to keep its parking lot in "perfect condition at every moment."

Appeals panel: Cook County judge wrong to toss class action vs LA Tan franchisee over customer finger scans

By Scott Holland | Oct 2, 2018

A state appeals panel has reversed a Cook County judge’s dismissal of a class action complaint accusing an LA Tan franchisee of violating an Illinois privacy law for the way it scanned and stored digital scans of customers’ fingerprints, saying the business’ disclosure of those fingerprints to a third-party vendor could be enough of a violation to sustain the lawsuit.

Appeals panel: Chicago not liable for man's fall after stepping out of cab on crumbling curb

By John Breslin | Oct 1, 2018

A man injured after stepping on a crumbled curb following his exit from a cab has no claim against the city of Chicago, a state appeals court has ruled.

Appeals judges: Lincolnshire, other towns can't create right-to-work zones, despite home rule powers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 1, 2018

Saying to find otherwise would create “catastrophic” consequences for labor law in Illinois and across the country, a federal appeals panel has backed a federal judge’s decision to toss an attempt by a northwest suburban village to use its home rule powers to create a local right-to-work zone within its borders.

Cook County OK to restrict campaign cash from lawyers, others seeking 'official action,' appeals court says

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 25, 2018

A state appellate court has again ruled Cook County has the power to make ethics rules that apply to county officers, including the Cook County Assessor, this time finding the County Board did not overstep in prohibiting real estate lawyers and otheers from contributing to the campaign coffers of county officials when they are seeking “official action” from the county.

Appeals court: Office Depot commission policies don't negate obligation to pay workers within month

By Cook County Record | Sep 24, 2018

Businesses who employ commissioned sales representatives may need to reevaluate their policies for paying commissions, after appeals judges said company policies don't trump Illinois law requiring employers to promptly pay commissioned sales reps.

Federal appeals court won’t review its decision to toss $3M verdict v. GSK; Plaintiff: ‘Dangerous precedent’

By Dan Churney | Sep 24, 2018

A Chicago federal appellate court has refused to reexamine its decision last month that reversed a $3 million verdict against drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline, on grounds the company was not responsible for the labeling of the generic version of its product Paxil, despite plaintiff’s urging a rehearing was needed, because she said the appeals panel set a “dangerous precedent.”

Lawyer can't get fees plus settlement cut in pro se action vs My Pillow over unpaid sales taxes: IL Sup Ct

By Scott Holland | Sep 21, 2018

The Illinois Supreme Court ruled an attorney collecting a settlement award from a lawsuit he pressed in his own name, ostensibly on behalf of the state of Illinois, against a business over alleged unpaid sales taxes, isn’t entitled also to collect additional legal fees.

IL Supreme Court: State law granting hospitals property tax exemption constitutional

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 20, 2018

Hospitals in Illinois have secured a key win in a longrunning court fight over whether they should be required to pay property taxes, as the Illinois Supreme Court has upheld as constitutional a state law allowing hospitals to remain tax exempt.

Appeals court OKs IL abortion funding, despite 'problematic' lack of revenue estimate; Appeal to IL Sup Ct vowed

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 20, 2018

A group of pro-life organizations seeking to undo Illinois legislation mandating taxpayer funding of abortion services has pledged to appeal their case to the Illinois Supreme Court, after a state appeals court opted not to compel the state of Illinois to account for where the money to pay for the abortions would come from.

Ex-Cook Sheriff's deputy loses bid to use Merit Board controversy to boost lawsuit over termination

By Cook County Record | Sep 18, 2018

A federal judge has taken down a fired Cook County Sheriff's deputy's attempt to use controversy surrounding the sheriff's Merit Board to keep alive his lawsuit over his termination.

Appeals panel: IL law OK letting committees controlled by legislative leaders give unlimited campaign cash

By Scott Holland | Sep 18, 2018

Brushing aside assertions the law allows party leaders to consolidate power statewide, a federal appeals panel has upheld an Illinois campaign finance law which restricts what individual donors can give to political campaigns, while allowing unlimited contributions from legislative caucus committees controlled by partisan leaders within the state's House and Senate.

Appeals court: IL doesn’t usurp feds’ power by making coal, gas burners subsidize Illinois nuke plants

By Dan Churney | Sep 17, 2018

A federal appellate court has affirmed a Chicago federal judge’s ruling that switched off suits by a group of electricity producers and Chicago-area power consumers, which sought to invalidate a state law requiring coal and gas burning electricity companies buy credits to prop up two failing Exelon nuclear plants, saying the law doesn’t infringe on federal regulatory prerogatives.

Appeals panel undoes $4.6M verdict for man who claimed contracted cancer from asbestos in welding rods

By Scott Holland | Sep 13, 2018

A state appeals panel has overturned a $4.6 million judgment in favor of a man who said he contracted mesothelioma by inhaling asbestos fibers while working near welding rods.

Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist Church accuses CEDA of wrongly denying appeal of site suspension

By Noddy A. Fernandez | Sep 11, 2018

Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist Church is suing a community action agency, citing alleged breach of contract.

Appeals panel: Parents can sue paint makers for kids' lead screening costs, even though covered by Medicaid

By Dan Churney | Sep 11, 2018

A Chicago appellate court has overturned a lower court’s dismissal of a class action by parents who wanted paint companies to pay for mandatory tests of their children to see if the children had lead in their blood, finding the parents still hold the right to sue the companies, even though Medicaid footed the bill.

The Record Network