Latest News

MAYER BROWN: IFLR1000 2019 ranks Mayer Brown in six jurisdictions and recognizes 165 individual partners

By Press release submission | Nov 7, 2018

Mayer Brown is ranked in IFLR1000’s “Financial and Corporate 2019” guide in six jurisdictions, in addition to 30 practice areas and industry sectors.

MAYER BROWN: Mayer Brown recognised in The Times Best Law Firms 2019

By Press release submission | Nov 7, 2018

Mayer Brown has been recognised in The Times Best Law Firms 2019, where it is commended for its work in commercial property.

After SCOTUS decision, others watching California's public nuisance lead paint action copied elsewhere

By Gabriel Neves | Nov 6, 2018

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision to deny paint manufacturers' appeal of a California ruling requiring them to pay more than $400 million for lead paint remediation, companies could face significantly greater odds of litigation under the theory of "public nuisance."

SCOTUS lets stand Penn high court's takeover of redistricting; Illinois reformers have taken note

By Cook County Record | Nov 5, 2018

After a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court rejecting Pennsylvania Republicans' attempt to redraw that state's congressional districts, an organization dedicated toward reforming how Illinois draws its legislative districts, which are currently skewed to favor Democrats, says the decision could help spur reform in other states, including Illinois, both legislatively and in the courts.

Judge OKs $3.75M deal to settle class action accusing Blue Cross parent over mental health claims

By DM Herra | Oct 25, 2018

A class-action suit alleging Health Care Service Corporation, the parent company of health insurance behemoth Blue Cross Blue Shield, improperly refused to pay for mental health services, has ended in a $3.75 million settlement. Attorneys will receive $1.13 million.

MAYER BROWN: Seasoned commercial litigation trial lawyer Megan Webster joins Mayer Brown in Chicago and New York

By Press release submission | Oct 25, 2018

Mayer Brown announced today that Megan S. Webster has joined the firm’s Litigation & Dispute Resolution practice as a partner.

From Legal Newsline

How much do lawsuits cost you? $3,300 per household, $429B nationwide, study says

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 24, 2018

Across the U.S., Americans pay hefty costs for lawsuits, with the price tag stretching from the courthouses to the most basic levels of American life, adding thousands of dollars each year to Americans’ household budget costs, according to a new study of tort litigation costs.

MAYER BROWN: Partner Tyrone Fahner receives Illinois Bar Foundation’s Distinguished Award for Excellence

By Press release submission | Oct 21, 2018

Mayer Brown announced that the Illinois Bar Foundation (IBF) has honored Litigation & Dispute Resolution partner Tyrone C. Fahner (Chicago) with the 2018 Distinguished Award for Excellence.

EEOC increases filings for workplace harassment lawsuits, driven partially by #MeToo movement

By Gabriel Neves | Oct 19, 2018

The number of workplace harassment lawsuits filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has spiked during the past four years, a Chicago lawyer says.

NorthShore says antitrust class action, accusing of overcharges, has no qualified representative

By Dan Churney | Oct 15, 2018

NorthShore University Health System wants a judge to strip the class-action status from an antitrust lawsuit against the hospital chain, which alleges NorthShore’s acquisition of a suburban hospital rubbed out competition and jacked up prices for patients, saying the sole remaining class representative has no standing to push the suit, because he suffered no injury.

Rosebud Restaurants, EEOC settle class action over workplace sexual harassment charges

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 10, 2018

Rosebud Restaurants has settled a potential class action brought by federal workplace discrimination monitors, who had accused the Italian restaurant chain of mistreating female employees, allowing them to be subjected to sexual harassment on the job.

Attorney: Court's denial of Lincolnshire right-to-work ordinance could forebode SCOTUS fight

By Gabriel Neves | Oct 9, 2018

A recent decision by a federal appeals court in Chicago likely forebodes a legal fight before the U.S. Supreme Court over the fate of so-called local right-to-work zones in Illinois and throughout the country.

Appeals judges: Lincolnshire, other towns can't create right-to-work zones, despite home rule powers

By Jonathan Bilyk | Oct 1, 2018

Saying to find otherwise would create “catastrophic” consequences for labor law in Illinois and across the country, a federal appeals panel has backed a federal judge’s decision to toss an attempt by a northwest suburban village to use its home rule powers to create a local right-to-work zone within its borders.

Choosing a hat: Proposal seeks to ease home closing costs by rewriting rules for IL lawyers who sell title insurance

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 28, 2018

A new legislative proposal would force real estate lawyers in Illinois who also serve as title insurance agents to 'choose which hat they will wear' in a home sale transaction, in a bid to reduce the typical closing costs paid by Illinois homeowners, and bring those costs more in line with the national average. But the proposal has drawn fire from lawyers and their associations, accusing supporters of the bill of unfairly 'scapegoating' lawyers for Illinois' relatively more expensive title insurance costs.

Third strike: Judge tosses racketeering suit vs Seyfarth Shaw, Northern Trust over tax shelters

By DM Herra | Sep 25, 2018

Prominent Chicago law firm Seyfarth Shaw, financial services company Northern Trust, and others have sidestepped a racketeering claim brought by a financial services provider who claimed he was misled into investing in an illegal tax shelter that eventually cost him more than $10 million in back taxes, fees, interest and penalties.

Federal appeals court won’t review its decision to toss $3M verdict v. GSK; Plaintiff: ‘Dangerous precedent’

By Dan Churney | Sep 24, 2018

A Chicago federal appellate court has refused to reexamine its decision last month that reversed a $3 million verdict against drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline, on grounds the company was not responsible for the labeling of the generic version of its product Paxil, despite plaintiff’s urging a rehearing was needed, because she said the appeals panel set a “dangerous precedent.”

Judge lets Cook Sheriff's Merit Board leave lawsuit over alleged anti-African American jobs discrimination

By Charmaine Little | Sep 21, 2018

A Chicago federal judge has, for now, blocked four African American men from pressing discrimination claims against the panel responsible for reviewing hiring and firing decisions at the Cook County Sheriff's Office, saying the men lacked standing to continue their suit alleging the Cook County Sheriff's Merit Board engaged in a pattern of discrimination when the sheriff's office declined their applications to become Cook County correctional officers. The lawsuit against the Cook County Sheriff, however, continues.

California boardroom gender quota bill is something for businesses in IL, elsewhere, "to watch," attorney says

By Gabriel Neves | Sep 19, 2018

A bill passed in California setting gender quotas on the boards of public companies could generate significant legal challenges, which likely would need to be resolved before other states move to copy it, an attorney following the legislation believes.

Appeals court: IL doesn’t usurp feds’ power by making coal, gas burners subsidize Illinois nuke plants

By Dan Churney | Sep 17, 2018

A federal appellate court has affirmed a Chicago federal judge’s ruling that switched off suits by a group of electricity producers and Chicago-area power consumers, which sought to invalidate a state law requiring coal and gas burning electricity companies buy credits to prop up two failing Exelon nuclear plants, saying the law doesn’t infringe on federal regulatory prerogatives.

Tinley Park to pay $410K to settle legal storm over handling of low-income housing project plan

By Jonathan Bilyk | Sep 17, 2018

The village of Tinley Park has settled a legal imbroglio over claims the village discriminated against predominantly black low income residents when it stalled approval of a controversial housing project planned for the community’s downtown area – a situation the village blamed in part on its ex-planner, who will get $360,000 under a proposed settlement.

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