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State tax inquiry not 'adversarial' enough to thwart lawsuit vs Best Buy over unpaid sales taxes: Appeal panel

Retail chain Best Buy can’t use an Illinois state investigation of its sales practices to sidestep a lawsuit brought by the owners of a Schaumburg Maytag appliance store, ostensibly on behalf of the state, accusing Best Buy, among other retailers, of sales tax fraud by misclassifying certain appliance sales as construction installations, a state appeals panel has ruled.

Self-driving cars, thinking machines will test limits of tort law

From
Legal Newsline

SEATTLE (Legal Newsline) - Self-driving cars, machines that teach themselves how to operate and home digital assistants that can enter into legally binding contracts are all either on the market now or soon will be. So the next question is: Whom do you sue when they run amok?

Appeals court: Indiana law barring abortions on basis of race, sex, disability unconstitutional; Dissent: Abortion now 'super-right'

A federal appeals court in Chicago has struck down an Indiana state law supporters argued was needed to extend anti-discrimination protections to unborn children, making it illegal for women and practitioners to perform an abortion strictly on the basis of the race, sex or potential disability of a fetus.

Development tax incentives, grants could be taxed, but shouldn't dissuade Amazon HQ2 bids, attorney says

Businesses who take advantage of government financial incentives to expand or build new facilities could face new tax liability under important IRS document issued 10 years ago, but just now coming into its own. However, that should not have much of an impact on the push by Chicago and other U.S. cities and states to land Amazon's HQ2, according to a leading tax expert, attorney and former director of South Carolina's Revenue Department.

Judge: UBS can't use arbitration clause to sidestep class action by fired employees over bonus payments

A federal judge has denied an attempt by UBS to sidestep a class action suit accusing the company of terminating employees to avoid paying their bonuses.

Trump's NLRB may undo rule giving grad students right to unionize; unions taking different approach

The Trump administration may push back—if it can—an Obama-era National Labor Relations Board decision that gave U.S. college and university graduate student workers the right to organize, which has been embraced by major unions.

Federal appeals court revives shelved data breach suit vs Barnes & Noble; 'trifling loss' still actual loss: Judges

Saying a “trifling loss” is still a loss under state consumer protection laws, a federal appeals panel has reopened the book on a potential class action lawsuit against Barnes & Noble over a 2012 data breach that cost customers some time and money in protecting themselves from potential identity theft, and which the appellate judges took care to note also victimized the chain of big box bookstores.

Judge again sinks Brunswick's bid to undo $25M deal with lawyer who used jury note to avoid loss at trial

A Chicago federal judge has again turned aside an attempt by boatmaker Brunswick to undo a $25 million personal injury settlement the company says was obtained through fraud, as a federal judge said the company has failed again to lay claim to a protected interest violated by a rival lawyer’s decision to allegedly withhold information about a jury note moments before a verdict would have delivered a win to Brunswick.

Appeals panel: Fired worker's 'last chance agreement' lets Cook County sidestep arbitration over termination

A labor grievance against Cook County won’t avoid its day in court after a state appeals panel said a “Last Chance Agreement” between the county and a fired worker allows the county to sidestep a union collective bargaining agreement, and thus nixes the union’s attempt to send the matter to arbitration.

SC Johnson fails to wipe away class action alleging kids' sunscreen's SPF ratings were false

One of the world’s largest makers of household chemical products, SC Johnson, was unable to persuade a federal judge to wipe away a class action lawsuit, accusing the company of misleading consumers about the SPF rating of its Babyganics mineral sunscreen.

Amtrak allegedly failed to provide safe work environment

A woman is suing Amtrak for allegedly taking insufficient measures to prevent injuries.

Appeals court pops the top on class action vs Walgreens for wrongly charging Chicago bottled water tax

Saying a Cook County judge was wrong to cap it off, a state appeals panel has popped the lid placed on a class action lawsuit accusing Walgreens of wrongly charging a Chicago city tax on bottled water.

Can Lincolnshire become right-to-work? Question may center on home rule, appeals court told

Whether the Chicago suburb of Lincolnshire can designate itself as a “right-to-work” community may come down to the question of whether, under Illinois’ home rule provisions, home rule communities, like Lincolnshire, can qualify as “the state” under federal labor laws.

Report: Asbestos litigation declines nationwide, slightly in Cook Co., still pervasive in three IL counties

As the number of new asbestos lawsuits declined nationally, activity in Illinois’ three hotbeds for asbestos litigation showed few signs of ebbing in 2017, even though the distribution of filing activity has shifted slightly.

Hyatt Hotels, Chicago police, others accused of wrongfully arresting man

A man is suing Hyatt Hotels Corporation, United Security Services Inc., The Habitat Company LLC, a security guard and three Chicago police officers for alleged false arrest.

Study on consumer lawsuit loans finds high rates, confusing terms

From
Legal Newsline

AUSTIN, Texas (Legal Newsline) - The broadest study yet of consumer litigation finance – money forwarded to lawsuit plaintiffs in anticipation of a victory in court or a legal settlement – found a “very complicated and circuitous” system in which some borrowers appear to subsidize others and the median interest rate exceeds 40%.

Lawyer says SCOTUS decision encourages whistleblowers to report to SEC, not to employers internally

A recent Supreme Court ruling may lead to more whistleblowers reporting alleged infractions within their companies to the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (SEC), rather than beginning the process first in-house, according to one legal expert

Road contractors' coalition asks court to order Cook County to free up $250M for transportaton projects

A coalition of trade groups representing road building contractors have sued Cook County, asking a judge to order the county to spend more money on maintaining and improving its roads, bridges and other transportation infrastructure, because the county, the lawsuit says, has detoured nearly $250 million that the groups assert should have been spent only on transportation projects.

Judge: Ex-Aon Bolivia CEO can't sidestep $20M lawsuit over alleged double-dealing

A federal judge has refused to let the former CEO of a South American Aon subsidiary end a $20 million federal lawsuit he faces in Chicago, in which he is accused of funneling company funds.

Black workers OK to continue discrimination suit vs staffer, employers allegedly favoring Hispanics

A group of companies facing racial discrimination lawsuits for allegedly passing over black workers in favor of Hispanic workers when hiring temporary workers, failed in their attempt to have the complaints dismissed.